Newsweek publishes its list of America’s Most Responsible Companies for 2023

15 01 2023

America’s Most Responsible Companies 2023

In recent years, and especially with the rise in popularity of “ESG” (environment, social and corporate governance) focused investing, “corporate responsibility” has become a phrase many companies are happy to use in their advertising. There is no set definition but generally it is used as shorthand for “Our company is not a soulless machine designed to do absolutely anything–no matter how destructive, reckless or dishonest–in pursuit of a buck.” In any given case, it can be hard to tell whether such a statement means a corporation really tries to treat its customers, employees and planet decently or is just public relations blather. Talking the talk is easy, but walking the walk is hard.

To highlight those corporations that are actually serious about trying to be good guys, Newsweek has partnered with global research and data firm Statista for our fourth annual list of America’s Most Responsible Companies. This year our list includes 500 of the U.S’s largest public corporations. They vary dramatically by size and by industry. We found the largest number of responsible companies (55) in the materials and chemicals business; the fewest (12) in hotels, dining and leisure. Our overall number one this year is the computer hardware giant HP.

We are proud to present this year’s ranking and to honor companies that actually mean it when they say they are serious about being good corporate citizens.

RankCompanyHQ StateIndustry RankIndustryOverall ScoreEnvironmental ScoreSocial ScoreCorporate Governance Score
1HPCalifornia1Technology Hardware93.0994.9499.5184.93
2General MillsMinnesota1Consumer Goods91.7992.0686.8496.56
3Whirlpool CorporationMichigan2Consumer Goods91.5393.8385.2195.64
4Merck & CoNew Jersey1Health Care & Life Sciences89.9591.07100.0078.86
5CloroxCalifornia3Consumer Goods89.5694.6888.0886.03
6HNIIowa4Consumer Goods89.4096.2187.9284.15
7Applied MaterialsCalifornia2Technology Hardware89.1291.0289.6486.80
8IntelCalifornia3Technology Hardware88.9888.3092.5186.21
9S&P GlobalNew York1Financial88.8095.2371.27100.00
10TapestryNew York5Consumer Goods88.6991.6087.4287.14
11XylemDistrict of Columbia1Capital Goods88.6895.0277.2193.90
12Abbott LaboratoriesIllinois2Health Care & Life Sciences88.0389.8480.9293.40
13QualcommCalifornia4Technology Hardware87.7283.3583.7996.10
14Keysight TechnologiesCalifornia1Software & Telecommunications87.6889.8679.2194.08
15AptargroupIllinois1Materials & Chemicals87.6896.7888.2478.13
16Texas InstrumentsTexas5Technology Hardware87.3984.5795.1582.53
17MicrosoftWashington2Software & Telecommunications86.9798.7669.1193.14
18Estee Lauder CompaniesNew York6Consumer Goods86.6192.8581.3885.69
19Cisco SystemsCalifornia6Technology Hardware86.5599.5174.5585.70
20Advanced Micro DevicesCalifornia7Technology Hardware86.5293.9775.3790.30
21BroadcomCalifornia8Technology Hardware86.2981.9282.4294.61
22AvientOhio2Materials & Chemicals86.2791.0978.5389.28
23Sensata TechnologiesMassachusetts9Technology Hardware86.0386.7878.1793.23
24Owens CorningOhio3Materials & Chemicals85.8082.4179.8995.19
25CortevaIndiana4Materials & Chemicals85.7981.4080.3895.69
26NVIDIACalifornia10Technology Hardware85.6986.9484.0886.13
27IlluminaCalifornia3Health Care & Life Sciences85.5490.5893.3772.75
28Campbell SoupNew Jersey7Consumer Goods85.2591.9078.6085.34
29Boston PropertiesMassachusetts1Real Estate & Housing85.2399.3878.1378.29
30Analog DevicesMassachusetts11Technology Hardware85.0995.5972.4587.34
31LumentumCalifornia3Software & Telecommunications85.0393.0876.4785.63
32JacobsTexas1Professional Services84.9895.2179.3280.50
33Maxim Integrated ProductsCalifornia12Technology Hardware84.9591.5780.1883.20
34Hewlett Packard EnterpriseTexas13Technology Hardware84.8095.3083.1576.04
35CumminsIndiana1Automotive & Components84.6392.1478.1683.68
36Lear CorporationMichigan2Automotive & Components84.6291.8170.8091.34
37Edgewell Personal CareConnecticut8Consumer Goods84.5789.8977.3486.57
38PayPal HoldingsCalifornia2Financial84.3593.7569.9789.42
39Walt DisneyCalifornia1Hotels, Dining & Leisure84.2793.5776.4082.94
40MastercardNew York3Financial84.2096.2765.9090.52
41ComericaTexas4Financial84.0990.7583.0178.59
42TrinseoPennsylvania5Materials & Chemicals84.0491.9977.8782.34
43United RentalsConnecticut2Professional Services83.7492.0981.6477.60
44Iron MountainMassachusetts4Software & Telecommunications83.7293.3572.5285.39
45Regeneron PharmaceuticalsNew York4Health Care & Life Sciences83.5685.0887.6977.98
46EcolabMinnesota6Materials & Chemicals83.5596.3884.5069.88
47Berry GlobalIndiana7Materials & Chemicals83.5190.2974.1286.20
48Sun CommunitiesMichigan2Real Estate & Housing83.4890.3674.0886.09
49Newmont GoldColorado8Materials & Chemicals83.4066.2194.6789.39
50Eversource EnergyMassachusetts1Energy & Utilities83.3094.1582.1973.66
51Vertex PharmaceuticalsMassachusetts5Health Care & Life Sciences83.2674.6191.8483.40
52SeagenWashington6Health Care & Life Sciences83.1884.0783.0682.48
53American TowerMassachusetts5Software & Telecommunications83.1287.1581.7480.56
54Lam ResearchCalifornia14Technology Hardware82.9992.9887.8868.22
55Granite ConstructionCalifornia2Capital Goods82.9883.9777.9187.15
56General MotorsMichigan3Automotive & Components82.9491.3468.2889.29
57CraneConnecticut9Materials & Chemicals82.7984.8177.9285.72
58IngevitySouth Carolina10Materials & Chemicals82.6372.5188.2187.23
59ZoetisNew Jersey7Health Care & Life Sciences82.6085.4177.7584.72
60Baxter InternationalIllinois8Health Care & Life Sciences82.5992.1780.8074.90
61Moody’sNew York5Financial82.5484.4471.1692.10
62Edwards LifesciencesCalifornia9Health Care & Life Sciences82.4986.8771.6389.05
63Lowe’s CompaniesNorth Carolina1Retail82.4091.2775.8880.12
64Public Service Enterprise GroupNew Jersey2Energy & Utilities82.3380.8381.8984.35
65Kimberly-ClarkTexas9Consumer Goods82.3079.5176.1491.33
66JabilFlorida15Technology Hardware82.1183.5273.9188.96
67Regency CentersFlorida3Real Estate & Housing82.0288.7677.3280.09
68Motorola SolutionsIllinois16Technology Hardware81.9990.4471.8883.74
69Keurig Dr PepperMassachusetts10Consumer Goods81.9888.0874.8683.09
70Dell TechnologiesTexas17Technology Hardware81.9392.2876.1377.47
71AGCOGeorgia3Capital Goods81.9275.6281.9988.23
72Las Vegas SandsNevada2Hotels, Dining & Leisure81.7687.3780.5277.47
73Waste ManagementTexas3Energy & Utilities81.6382.3684.3078.31
74Jones Lang LaSalleIllinois4Real Estate & Housing81.6384.2672.3188.39
75Western DigitalCalifornia18Technology Hardware81.5883.5683.1878.08
76Armstrong World IndustriesPennsylvania4Capital Goods81.4884.0278.0782.42
77RibbonTexas6Software & Telecommunications81.3982.5077.3184.44
78KrogerOhio2Retail81.3488.1571.7684.19
79Principal Financial GroupIowa6Financial81.2183.4873.9486.29
80CaleresMissouri11Consumer Goods81.1481.3281.9880.19
81McCormick & CompanyMaryland12Consumer Goods81.0693.5983.2666.42
82Summit MaterialsColorado11Materials & Chemicals80.9883.8972.8786.26
83Kimball InternationalIndiana13Consumer Goods80.8989.7279.0574.01
84AdobeCalifornia7Software & Telecommunications80.8788.8171.9981.89
85AmphenolConnecticut19Technology Hardware80.8489.6773.7079.25
86Huntington BancsharesOhio7Financial80.8284.5079.2678.80
87Cadence Design SystemsCalifornia8Software & Telecommunications80.7963.7989.2289.41
88PPLPennsylvania4Energy & Utilities80.7868.5799.2874.55
89Ball CorpColorado12Materials & Chemicals80.6986.8479.9575.38
90EXL ServicesNew York3Professional Services80.6777.7272.0392.33
91Healthpeak PropertiesColorado5Real Estate & Housing80.5490.2874.8476.59
92Sherwin-WilliamsOhio13Materials & Chemicals80.4987.9970.0683.50
93Univar SolutionsIllinois14Materials & Chemicals80.4792.8262.6586.02
94American WaterNew Jersey5Energy & Utilities80.4374.2291.9475.22
95HasbroRhode Island14Consumer Goods80.4189.3785.2266.72
96AppleCalifornia20Technology Hardware80.2491.3763.0086.45
97TargetMinnesota3Retail80.1890.2170.3080.10
98Newell BrandsGeorgia15Consumer Goods80.0081.8872.4485.75
99DeereIllinois5Capital Goods80.0087.9387.4364.71
100ManpowerGroupWisconsin4Professional Services79.9393.0972.2774.53
101Agilent TechnologiesCalifornia10Health Care & Life Sciences79.9394.5264.9280.45
102Baker HughesTexas6Energy & Utilities79.8991.9077.3470.53
103American ExpressNew York8Financial79.8793.4664.7181.55
104PNC Financial ServicesPennsylvania9Financial79.8183.3278.9877.22
105Hudson Pacific PropertiesCalifornia6Real Estate & Housing79.7084.2175.6579.33
106First SolarArizona7Energy & Utilities79.6789.7873.5875.74
107Eastman ChemicalTennessee15Materials & Chemicals79.6668.3486.2484.48
108Mettler-Toledo InternationalOhio21Technology Hardware79.6188.1964.8185.91
109NielsenNew York5Professional Services79.5983.7174.1680.98
110HessNew York8Energy & Utilities79.5977.8881.7379.24
111Colgate-PalmoliveNew York16Consumer Goods79.5580.5474.8783.31
112CenterPoint EnergyTexas9Energy & Utilities79.5471.0192.3775.31
113CBRE GroupTexas7Real Estate & Housing79.5272.9977.7187.94
114PPG IndustriesPennsylvania16Materials & Chemicals79.4782.4077.5878.53
115Becton Dickinson andNew Jersey11Health Care & Life Sciences79.4688.5168.8681.09
116Carter’sGeorgia17Consumer Goods79.4188.6974.6774.98
117Verizon CommunicationsNew York9Software & Telecommunications79.3988.2073.2776.79
118UbiquitiNew York10Software & Telecommunications79.1683.5564.8389.18
119BorgWarnerMichigan4Automotive & Components79.0779.1178.4979.67
120PotlatchDelticWashington6Capital Goods79.0578.8472.5185.88
121M&T BankNew York10Financial79.0183.6570.1883.28
122W W GraingerIllinois7Capital Goods78.9576.6775.7484.51
123AutodeskCalifornia11Software & Telecommunications78.9484.1384.9667.82
124IBMNew York12Software & Telecommunications78.8780.9676.7878.93
125Howmet AerospacePennsylvania8Capital Goods78.8580.6369.0286.99
126Deckers OutdoorCalifornia18Consumer Goods78.8369.7382.8284.02
127California Water Service GroupCalifornia10Energy & Utilities78.7770.1489.8476.40
128Regal RexnordWisconsin9Capital Goods78.6793.1167.7375.26
129NasdaqNew York11Financial78.6776.0163.9996.08
130Micron TechnologyIdaho22Technology Hardware78.6480.3678.3077.34
131Zurn Elkay Water SolutionsWisconsin10Capital Goods78.5680.9676.5878.22
132Thermo Fisher ScientificMassachusetts12Health Care & Life Sciences78.5477.0372.5586.11
133CommScope Holding CompanyNorth Carolina23Technology Hardware78.4794.4267.5473.55
134Kraft HeinzIllinois19Consumer Goods78.4581.0870.6483.71
135FMCPennsylvania17Materials & Chemicals78.3885.0167.1283.09
136Tennant CompanyMinnesota11Capital Goods78.3767.7487.1180.34
137CSXFlorida1Transport & Logistics78.2684.6469.5880.65
138CelaneseTexas18Materials & Chemicals78.2669.3497.3568.16
139AZZTexas12Capital Goods78.2083.2765.9785.43
140IDEXX LaboratoriesMaine13Health Care & Life Sciences78.1975.7882.6276.26
141GapCalifornia4Retail78.1977.4367.9989.22
142Williams CompaniesOklahoma11Energy & Utilities78.1766.1492.0376.41
143Emerson ElectricMissouri13Capital Goods78.1385.1172.7676.61
144Church & DwightNew Jersey20Consumer Goods78.0793.4472.0368.82
145Marriott InternationalMaryland3Hotels, Dining & Leisure78.0679.5581.8272.88
146SempraCalifornia12Energy & Utilities78.0565.6388.5680.02
147InvescoGeorgia12Financial78.0391.1365.3277.73
148ValvolineKentucky5Automotive & Components77.9278.8972.4182.54
149Ingersoll RandNorth Carolina14Capital Goods77.8881.9666.9384.83
150UnitedHealth GroupMinnesota14Health Care & Life Sciences77.8891.8671.4470.43
151ViasatCalifornia13Software & Telecommunications77.8487.0373.7772.83
152The Home DepotGeorgia5Retail77.8078.6276.6378.25
153Host Hotels & ResortsMaryland4Hotels, Dining & Leisure77.7890.0668.7874.60
154Norfolk SouthernGeorgia2Transport & Logistics77.7782.8270.7979.77
155RepligenMassachusetts15Health Care & Life Sciences77.7676.5566.7190.08
156VisteonMichigan6Automotive & Components77.7492.0473.4267.87
157Yum! BrandsKentucky5Hotels, Dining & Leisure77.7191.5862.7778.88
158Lennox InternationalTexas15Capital Goods77.7189.8474.6668.70
159ServiceNowCalifornia14Software & Telecommunications77.6878.0168.5286.58
160Commercial Metals CompanyTexas19Materials & Chemicals77.6882.8070.4579.86
161Conagra BrandsIllinois21Consumer Goods77.6390.1369.8173.03
162WatersMassachusetts16Health Care & Life Sciences77.6392.6567.2673.06
163JPMorgan Chase & CoNew York13Financial77.6084.0163.4985.37
164AbbVieIllinois17Health Care & Life Sciences77.5584.3970.8377.52
165MetLifeNew York14Financial77.4881.3467.3283.87
166West Pharmaceutical ServicesPennsylvania18Health Care & Life Sciences77.4479.2469.2283.95
167California ResourcesCalifornia13Energy & Utilities77.2873.0283.6975.20
168DanaherDistrict of Columbia19Health Care & Life Sciences77.2269.8677.6584.23
169FedExTennessee3Transport & Logistics77.2173.6875.9582.08
170NordsonOhio16Capital Goods77.1570.8083.4177.30
171Bank of AmericaNorth Carolina15Financial77.1490.2969.7371.50
172USANA Health SciencesUtah22Consumer Goods77.0274.0575.4481.65
173LabcorpNorth Carolina20Health Care & Life Sciences76.9684.1170.4876.40
174TeradataCalifornia15Software & Telecommunications76.9578.6861.3190.94
175Best BuyMinnesota6Retail76.8892.5272.7665.45
176KennametalPennsylvania17Capital Goods76.8886.1673.5371.02
177Stanley Black & DeckerConnecticut18Capital Goods76.8792.6664.9073.14
178AlcoaPennsylvania20Materials & Chemicals76.8061.4381.7187.33
179KoppersPennsylvania20Materials & Chemicals76.8079.1880.9070.41
180United TherapeuticsMaryland21Health Care & Life Sciences76.7961.4583.9485.03
181PfizerNew York22Health Care & Life Sciences76.7673.3569.7887.21
182MascoMichigan19Capital Goods76.6975.3669.0985.71
183Kimco RealtyNew York8Real Estate & Housing76.6786.4085.3258.37
184Qurate Retail GroupPennsylvania7Retail76.5688.5571.5369.68
185OtisConnecticut20Capital Goods76.5075.2872.0382.26
186Organon & Co.New Jersey23Health Care & Life Sciences76.4376.6284.3168.44
187Reliance Worldwide CorporationGeorgia21Capital Goods76.3867.2675.2486.71
188Air Products and ChemicalsPennsylvania22Materials & Chemicals76.3778.0176.9974.18
189Fluor CorporationTexas22Capital Goods76.3380.7070.0378.34
190SPXNorth Carolina23Capital Goods76.3178.1471.9378.94
191Darling IngredientsTexas23Consumer Goods76.2971.3668.3489.25
192Insulet CorporationMassachusetts24Health Care & Life Sciences76.2479.8077.5771.45
193Essex Property TrustCalifornia9Real Estate & Housing76.1688.5471.3868.65
194Truist FinancialNorth Carolina16Financial76.1168.7882.0477.59
195AtkoreIllinois24Capital Goods76.1175.2667.0686.09
196Pioneer Natural ResourcesTexas14Energy & Utilities76.0982.8079.1966.36
197VMwareCalifornia16Software & Telecommunications75.99100.0045.9282.14
198Regions FinancialAlabama17Financial75.9773.1977.6677.14
199WorkdayCalifornia17Software & Telecommunications75.9778.8867.5281.59
200SnapCalifornia18Software & Telecommunications75.9271.2884.7771.77
201PVHNew York8Retail75.9088.6066.9772.21
202Fifth Third BankOhio18Financial75.8993.1970.2564.33
203InfineraCalifornia24Technology Hardware75.8981.9468.9976.82
204Kilroy RealtyCalifornia10Real Estate & Housing75.8788.9263.4275.36
205Watts Water TechnologiesMassachusetts25Capital Goods75.8380.2466.1581.17
206XeroxConnecticut25Technology Hardware75.8096.3862.4868.63
207PrudentialNew Jersey19Financial75.7881.0965.5580.79
208Digital Realty TrustTexas11Real Estate & Housing75.7780.9278.3968.09
209OnsemiArizona26Technology Hardware75.6885.9956.0785.06
210BizLinkCalifornia26Technology Hardware75.6880.8273.6572.64
211Brixmor Property GroupNew York12Real Estate & Housing75.6573.2787.6166.15
212APA CorpTexas15Energy & Utilities75.5964.6174.6387.61
213Tractor Supply Co.Tennessee9Retail75.5080.3677.1769.07
214Dover CorporationIllinois26Capital Goods75.4773.5368.8184.14
215Universal DisplayNew Jersey28Technology Hardware75.4474.9980.4770.93
216United Parcel ServiceGeorgia4Transport & Logistics75.4375.2074.2676.91
217DanaOhio7Automotive & Components75.4283.1170.3872.86
218MicrochipArizona29Technology Hardware75.4281.4764.4380.44
219Teledyne TechnologiesCalifornia30Technology Hardware75.4180.2369.8976.18
220Element SolutionsFlorida23Materials & Chemicals75.4086.7466.4673.09
221GXOConnecticut5Transport & Logistics75.3276.8379.6269.60
222Fortune BrandsIllinois24Consumer Goods75.2980.4671.9573.53
223Weatherford InternationalTexas16Energy & Utilities75.2570.3578.9876.48
224Federal Realty Investment TrustMaryland13Real Estate & Housing75.2186.3264.4174.97
225J M SmuckerOhio25Consumer Goods75.2086.3563.5275.81
226GlobalFoundriesNew York31Technology Hardware75.1688.6966.3570.52
227AT&TTexas19Software & Telecommunications75.1480.1672.3672.97
228General ElectricMassachusetts27Capital Goods75.1077.6370.3777.37
229HubbellConnecticut28Capital Goods75.0577.6369.0978.51
230VF CorporationColorado26Consumer Goods75.0584.5869.7670.88
231AvalonBay CommunitiesVirginia14Real Estate & Housing74.8392.1467.1165.32
232Vornado Realty TrustNew York15Real Estate & Housing74.7990.4362.6971.34
233Crown HoldingsPennsylvania24Materials & Chemicals74.7774.3063.9286.16
234VirtusaMassachusetts20Software & Telecommunications74.6789.4864.0370.59
235CintasOhio27Consumer Goods74.6075.7168.6479.53
236State StreetMassachusetts20Financial74.5988.5853.6481.63
237Public StorageCalifornia16Real Estate & Housing74.5186.4770.0167.14
238GreifOhio25Materials & Chemicals74.4487.0258.1678.23
239Pacific Premier BancorpCalifornia21Financial74.3783.9369.6469.63
240Helmerich & PayneOklahoma17Energy & Utilities74.3667.6873.1382.34
241Salesforce.ComCalifornia21Software & Telecommunications74.2778.9671.6672.28
242LPL FinancialCalifornia22Financial74.2681.8669.4571.54
243Comfort Systems USATexas29Capital Goods74.2277.0668.9976.69
244Realty IncomeCalifornia17Real Estate & Housing74.2070.2089.5862.89
245National Energy Services ReunitedTexas18Energy & Utilities74.1979.0066.0877.58
246AlbemarleNorth Carolina26Materials & Chemicals74.1970.5883.9368.13
247Crown CastleTexas22Software & Telecommunications74.1571.8972.7077.93
248Arista NetworksCalifornia23Software & Telecommunications74.0576.5065.1080.64
249Quaker HoughtonPennsylvania27Materials & Chemicals74.0375.3460.0586.78
250ADMIllinois28Consumer Goods73.9780.6072.9668.45
251BungeMissouri29Consumer Goods73.9188.1567.9065.76
252UnumTennessee23Financial73.9071.2371.5079.04
253SBAFlorida24Software & Telecommunications73.8767.9566.8286.92
254Hormel FoodsMinnesota30Consumer Goods73.8779.3283.4558.93
255VentasIllinois18Real Estate & Housing73.8171.8170.4579.24
256SpireMissouri19Energy & Utilities73.7964.7785.2471.43
257TimkenOhio30Capital Goods73.7780.5271.7069.18
258Bank of New York MellonNew York24Financial73.7687.9265.3868.07
259Omnicom GroupNew York6Professional Services73.7471.8971.3378.07
260ItronWashington7Professional Services73.7380.4068.4372.44
261Phibro Animal HealthNew Jersey25Health Care & Life Sciences73.7271.0669.6280.55
262Constellation Energy CorporationMaryland20Energy & Utilities73.7064.2985.6671.20
263Juniper NetworksCalifornia32Technology Hardware73.6767.2974.1679.62
264Cirrus LogicTexas33Technology Hardware73.6463.0473.1784.78
265Adtalem Global EducationIllinois8Professional Services73.6377.2271.7771.99
266TeradyneMassachusetts34Technology Hardware73.6079.6349.8891.39
267ABM IndustriesNew York9Professional Services73.6056.9877.1186.77
268CoupaCalifornia25Software & Telecommunications73.5673.9065.7181.15
269Allison TransmissionIndiana31Capital Goods73.5180.6664.3275.63
270MacerichCalifornia19Real Estate & Housing73.5090.0356.9173.64
271Illinois Tool WorksIllinois32Capital Goods73.4482.9468.8368.64
272Kosmos EnergyTexas21Energy & Utilities73.4270.5580.3569.43
273TPI CompositesArizona33Capital Goods73.4273.5382.3564.43
274Knowles CorporationIllinois35Technology Hardware73.4087.2468.2964.75
275TJX CompaniesMassachusetts10Retail73.3773.7766.6679.75
276Avanos MedicalGeorgia26Health Care & Life Sciences73.3676.4873.2370.45
277AMETEKPennsylvania36Technology Hardware73.2686.1570.6663.07
278Tanger Factory Outlet CentersNorth Carolina20Real Estate & Housing73.2583.3574.9861.52
279Cooper-Standard HoldingsMichigan8Automotive & Components73.1190.4672.4156.55
280NiSourceIndiana22Energy & Utilities73.0871.7076.5471.06
281American Axle & Manufacturing HoldingsMichigan9Automotive & Components73.0478.0465.5275.64
282HalliburtonTexas23Energy & Utilities73.0374.0671.4973.63
283Helen of TroyTexas31Consumer Goods73.0079.4579.5360.11
284NetAppCalifornia26Software & Telecommunications72.9667.8260.0091.13
285ResMedCalifornia27Health Care & Life Sciences72.9374.9067.8876.08
286Alliant EnergyWisconsin24Energy & Utilities72.9369.0886.6563.12
287Hilton Worldwide HoldingsVirginia6Hotels, Dining & Leisure72.9275.4267.5775.85
288CatalentNew Jersey28Health Care & Life Sciences72.9281.3068.6368.90
289WestrockGeorgia28Materials & Chemicals72.9064.8270.8183.14
290CarrierFlorida34Capital Goods72.8780.9272.6465.13
291Expeditors International of WashingtonWashington6Transport & Logistics72.8480.8076.3261.48
292GenArizona27Software & Telecommunications72.8061.3167.4189.73
293Mueller Water ProductsGeorgia35Capital Goods72.7974.3470.8073.31
294CaterpillarIllinois36Capital Goods72.7276.5862.0679.62
295Green PlainsNebraska29Materials & Chemicals72.7161.1875.0781.94
296XPO LogisticsConnecticut7Transport & Logistics72.7067.6672.5877.94
297Equity ResidentialIllinois21Real Estate & Housing72.6684.7065.6467.73
298AramarkPennsylvania7Hotels, Dining & Leisure72.6274.9968.8774.06
299Alphabet (Google)California28Software & Telecommunications72.5388.9359.5069.25
300PetcoCalifornia11Retail72.5084.1659.5773.83
301Ormat TechnologiesNevada25Energy & Utilities72.4970.3171.2875.96
302MattelCalifornia32Consumer Goods72.4480.9270.7965.71
303Hecla MiningIdaho30Materials & Chemicals72.3977.5158.8980.84
304FactSetConnecticut25Financial72.3751.5373.5892.06
305Simpson Manufacturing CompanyCalifornia37Capital Goods72.3668.7477.9370.49
306Compass Minerals InternationalKansas31Materials & Chemicals72.3263.9873.7279.33
307Charles River LaboratoriesMassachusetts29Health Care & Life Sciences72.3177.8374.3264.86
308Graphic PackagingGeorgia32Materials & Chemicals72.3069.0072.9974.98
309GrafTech InternationalOhio38Capital Goods72.2670.2871.3475.22
310KeyCorpOhio26Financial72.2579.8559.8777.10
311OshkoshWisconsin10Automotive & Components72.2083.5370.9362.21
312Kansas City SouthernMissouri8Transport & Logistics72.1158.9979.0978.29
313IPGNew York10Professional Services72.1074.3160.2081.88
314HubSpotMassachusetts29Software & Telecommunications72.0979.3851.3685.62
315Goodyear Tire & Rubber CoOhio11Automotive & Components72.0679.6970.6565.93
316Kelly ServicesMichigan11Professional Services72.0270.5775.1170.46
317SimsNew York33Materials & Chemicals71.9781.0564.9969.95
318BalchemNew York34Materials & Chemicals71.9358.1568.0289.68
319CotyNew York33Consumer Goods71.9083.4272.7559.62
320KratonTexas35Materials & Chemicals71.9071.6470.9873.15
321DXC TechnologyVirginia12Professional Services71.8677.4565.6872.54
322Worthington IndustriesOhio36Materials & Chemicals71.8387.7054.7373.14
323SanminaCalifornia37Technology Hardware71.7779.0754.6081.73
324Scotts Miracle-GroOhio37Materials & Chemicals71.7677.4169.0068.94
325NOVTexas26Energy & Utilities71.7569.2375.8570.23
326Columbus McKinnonNew York39Capital Goods71.6990.9464.4559.76
327U.S. SilicaTexas38Materials & Chemicals71.5673.6580.8960.23
328SynopsysCalifornia30Software & Telecommunications71.5169.4463.5281.63
329AECOMTexas13Professional Services71.4655.0880.0879.28
330UnifiNorth Carolina39Materials & Chemicals71.4573.5064.8876.06
331FortiveWashington40Capital Goods71.4256.8962.7694.67
332Schlumberger NVTexas27Energy & Utilities71.4284.8871.9357.52
333Masonite InternationalFlorida41Capital Goods71.4077.2967.4469.54
334HologicMassachusetts30Health Care & Life Sciences71.3870.3058.1185.80
335Pactiv EvergreenIllinois40Materials & Chemicals71.3672.1170.5271.53
336ICFVirginia14Professional Services71.2284.3973.1056.25
337HanesbrandsNorth Carolina34Consumer Goods71.1585.8364.2263.47
338Empire State Reality TrustNew York22Real Estate & Housing71.1280.4452.8180.20
339Union PacificNebraska9Transport & Logistics71.1083.6955.9673.75
340Williams-SonomaCalifornia35Consumer Goods71.0663.2870.1679.80
341National InstrumentsTexas31Software & Telecommunications71.0477.7867.1768.26
342KLA CorporationCalifornia38Technology Hardware71.0440.0677.7295.39
343GartnerConnecticut15Professional Services71.0258.9667.9186.23
344Mid-America Apartment CommunitiesTennessee23Real Estate & Housing71.0085.7553.1574.19
345SteelcaseMichigan36Consumer Goods70.9987.8962.9462.22
346Molson Coors BrewingIllinois37Consumer Goods70.9683.2866.6763.00
347C.H. RobinsonMinnesota10Transport & Logistics70.8964.1975.6572.90
348AkamaiMassachusetts32Software & Telecommunications70.8877.9350.3984.42
349IntuitiveCalifornia31Health Care & Life Sciences70.8862.6377.8572.21
350Packaging Corporation of AmericaIllinois41Materials & Chemicals70.8563.8565.4783.28
351Ralph LaurenNew York38Consumer Goods70.8592.1149.9770.55
352ZendeskCalifornia33Software & Telecommunications70.7365.3467.8779.04
353Silicon LabsTexas39Technology Hardware70.6688.8970.4152.78
354SL Green RealtyNew York24Real Estate & Housing70.6578.4054.9478.70
355Dick’s Sporting GoodsPennsylvania12Retail70.6471.5162.0178.47
356MSA SafetyPennsylvania16Professional Services70.5083.2967.3360.97
357Global PaymentsGeorgia27Financial70.4884.1558.5168.87
358Murphy USAArkansas13Retail70.4463.6471.9975.76
359EntergyLouisiana28Energy & Utilities70.3844.9998.1568.05
360Essential UtilitiesPennsylvania29Energy & Utilities70.3780.1873.4057.61
361Howard HughesTexas25Real Estate & Housing70.2874.9562.1073.86
362Palo Alto NetworksCalifornia34Software & Telecommunications70.2377.1267.2466.41
363ONEOKOklahoma30Energy & Utilities70.2363.8073.1373.83
364Dominion EnergyVirginia31Energy & Utilities70.2150.7387.5672.38
365BrunswickIllinois42Capital Goods70.1865.2564.7780.60
366CF Industries HoldingsIllinois42Materials & Chemicals70.1745.3973.1292.05
367Marsh McLennanNew York17Professional Services70.1157.7364.8387.81
368Bread FinancialOhio28Financial70.0769.0667.2174.01
369Merit Medical SystemsUtah32Health Care & Life Sciences70.0762.3472.2875.64
370PerkinElmerMassachusetts33Health Care & Life Sciences70.0562.7565.4082.08
371Sonoco ProductsSouth Carolina43Materials & Chemicals70.0585.3860.1264.73
372GoDaddyArizona35Software & Telecommunications70.0471.3853.7785.03
373Ziff DavisNew York36Software & Telecommunications70.0254.4768.7386.90
374GenthermMichigan12Automotive & Components70.0177.0562.8670.19
375FormFactorCalifornia40Technology Hardware69.9579.3250.3680.26
376The Cheesecake FactoryCalifornia8Hotels, Dining & Leisure69.9383.3349.5676.98
377Skywork SolutionsCalifornia41Technology Hardware69.9271.8969.8868.06
378AmedisysLouisiana34Health Care & Life Sciences69.8967.7575.1566.82
379Booz Allen HamiltonVirginia18Professional Services69.8756.4771.2981.91
380Polaris Inc.Minnesota13Automotive & Components69.8481.8366.5961.19
381UDRColorado26Real Estate & Housing69.8481.7060.6467.26
382TextronRhode Island43Capital Goods69.8180.6164.9963.92
383Brown-FormanKentucky39Consumer Goods69.8164.3957.9787.12
384KB HomeCalifornia27Real Estate & Housing69.7757.1975.4076.77
385Sensient TechnologiesWisconsin44Materials & Chemicals69.7468.5562.2778.46
386Winnebago IndustriesIowa14Automotive & Components69.6861.4457.2490.41
387BurlingtonNew Jersey14Retail69.6191.2860.2457.40
388Dentsply SironaNorth Carolina35Health Care & Life Sciences69.6081.1476.7151.02
389TimkenSteelOhio45Materials & Chemicals69.5568.2965.2575.20
390SunPowerCalifornia32Energy & Utilities69.5170.8779.4458.30
391DiscoverIllinois29Financial69.4469.6866.2372.47
392Meritage HomesArizona28Real Estate & Housing69.4247.7165.0695.55
393EnerSysPennsylvania42Technology Hardware69.4077.9848.7781.53
394Harley-DavidsonWisconsin15Automotive & Components69.3478.1165.6864.31
395TerexConnecticut44Capital Goods69.3167.0876.0564.87
396Cabot MicroelectronicsIllinois43Technology Hardware69.3084.1169.3554.52
397Clearway EnergyNew Jersey33Energy & Utilities69.2878.6468.7860.48
398DTE EnergyMichigan34Energy & Utilities69.1556.6079.6771.23
399Franklin ElectricIndiana44Technology Hardware69.1374.7869.1963.49
400Corporate Office Properties TrustMaryland29Real Estate & Housing69.0277.0368.9161.19
401ManitowocWisconsin45Capital Goods68.9963.3271.2872.42
402MPLX LPOhio35Energy & Utilities68.9861.1965.1180.69
403H&R BlockMissouri19Professional Services68.9768.0668.1270.80
404Xcel EnergyMinnesota36Energy & Utilities68.9253.4978.7574.58
405Ameriprise FinancialMinnesota30Financial68.9162.6852.9491.19
406AMN Healthcare ServicesTexas36Health Care & Life Sciences68.8966.5768.7671.40
407T. Rowe PriceMaryland31Financial68.8970.4367.5368.78
408T-MobileWashington37Software & Telecommunications68.8392.8549.8763.88
409Lumen TechnologiesLouisiana38Software & Telecommunications68.7774.7466.6165.04
410Renewable Energy GroupIowa37Energy & Utilities68.7682.8078.4145.16
411Iridium CommunicationsVirginia39Software & Telecommunications68.7481.0251.4673.82
412BlackbaudSouth Carolina40Software & Telecommunications68.6279.1352.7474.06
413Sunstone Hotel InvestorsCalifornia30Real Estate & Housing68.5575.4964.4365.81
414Gates Industrial CorporationColorado46Capital Goods68.5269.1775.1461.34
415Thor IndustriesIndiana16Automotive & Components68.4672.1859.2074.07
416International Flavors & FragrancesNew York46Materials & Chemicals68.4474.9265.5264.94
417PrologisCalifornia31Real Estate & Housing68.4069.6468.5867.06
418EquinixCalifornia41Software & Telecommunications68.3963.8266.8674.55
419Vistra EnergyTexas38Energy & Utilities68.3857.1580.4567.60
420CrestwoodTexas39Energy & Utilities68.3259.9883.3261.72
421AlnylamMassachusetts37Health Care & Life Sciences68.3276.4169.0659.56
422CeridianMinnesota42Software & Telecommunications68.2978.1463.8362.97
423LittelfuseIllinois45Technology Hardware68.2578.9469.8956.00
424Brinker InternationalTexas9Hotels, Dining & Leisure68.2479.2956.0769.43
425Hersha Hospitality TrustPennsylvania32Real Estate & Housing68.1385.6756.0062.82
426AARIllinois11Transport & Logistics68.1269.4850.9983.97
427Nextera EnergyFlorida40Energy & Utilities68.1256.4883.8964.05
428Tyler TechnologiesTexas43Software & Telecommunications68.0679.9661.0663.23
429NorthWestern EnergySouth Dakota41Energy & Utilities68.0452.9480.9970.26
430Roper TechnologiesFlorida46Technology Hardware68.0158.0065.8680.22
431Lincoln NationalPennsylvania32Financial68.0087.9367.0949.08
432Automatic Data ProcessingNew Jersey44Software & Telecommunications67.9960.5661.0282.44
433Taylor MorrisonArizona33Real Estate & Housing67.9832.6480.9490.39
434IPG PhotonicsNew York47Technology Hardware67.9859.5366.0678.40
435Western MidstreamTexas42Energy & Utilities67.9653.4465.6984.82
436Hawaiian Electric IndustriesHawaii43Energy & Utilities67.8653.0882.3768.19
437WESCO InternationalPennsylvania12Transport & Logistics67.8572.4870.4060.73
438DolbyCalifornia45Software & Telecommunications67.8452.0070.0781.50
439Southwest AirlinesTexas13Transport & Logistics67.7366.8361.8774.56
440CallawayCalifornia40Consumer Goods67.7260.1968.0674.96
441Alamo GroupTexas14Transport & Logistics67.7078.1860.7564.24
442Cooper TiresOhio17Automotive & Components67.6972.6964.0866.37
443KadantMassachusetts48Technology Hardware67.6869.8752.9180.33
444WolfspeedNorth Carolina48Technology Hardware67.6881.2265.2856.61
445EnphaseCalifornia50Technology Hardware67.6762.9572.2367.90
446CohuCalifornia51Technology Hardware67.6465.3662.1275.52
447Sprouts Farmers MarketArizona15Retail67.6368.2662.3972.32
448Monolithic Power SystemsWashington52Technology Hardware67.6162.2665.6075.04
449FISFlorida46Software & Telecommunications67.5070.3852.6479.55
450Sleep NumberMinnesota16Retail67.5070.3760.6671.53
451Synchrony FinancialConnecticut33Financial67.4459.8277.3965.17
452Paramount GlobalNew York10Hotels, Dining & Leisure67.3964.3068.4469.48
453Henry ScheinNew York38Health Care & Life Sciences67.3565.0661.0676.00
454eHealthCalifornia34Financial67.3469.5570.9461.60
455LiventPennsylvania47Materials & Chemicals67.2773.7766.6761.45
456Carlisle CompaniesArizona48Materials & Chemicals67.1666.9453.4681.15
457Cooper CompaniesCalifornia39Health Care & Life Sciences67.1650.5872.9677.98
458VeecoNew York53Technology Hardware67.1586.5244.8870.13
459O-IOhio49Materials & Chemicals67.1149.8077.2974.29
460Sealed AirNorth Carolina50Materials & Chemicals67.0768.6460.1972.44
461Cornerstone Building BrandsNorth Carolina47Capital Goods67.0675.4965.0060.79
462Pebblebrook Hotel TrustMaryland11Hotels, Dining & Leisure67.0679.5763.7157.99
463GibraltarNew York48Capital Goods67.0566.8474.2260.18
464Varex ImagingUtah40Health Care & Life Sciences66.9969.4466.6464.95
465NRG EnergyTexas44Energy & Utilities66.9549.3072.1679.44
466FiservWisconsin47Software & Telecommunications66.8957.6066.2776.88
467HawkinsMinnesota51Materials & Chemicals66.7464.9661.3074.03
468Rogers CorporationArizona52Materials & Chemicals66.7173.9864.0062.22
469HF SinclaorTexas45Energy & Utilities66.6476.6574.4248.93
470MDU ResourcesNorth Dakota45Energy & Utilities66.6444.7584.9870.23
471National VisionGeorgia17Retail66.5955.1959.0585.60
472TransUnionIllinois20Professional Services66.5883.0254.3762.45
473Paramount GroupNew York34Real Estate & Housing66.5268.0054.8976.73
474Citrix SystemsFlorida48Software & Telecommunications66.4359.4351.1388.79
475ANSYSPennsylvania48Software & Telecommunications66.4369.5962.4567.31
476IntuitCalifornia50Software & Telecommunications66.4071.1659.2468.87
477SwitchNevada54Technology Hardware66.3664.5966.9667.59
478VeritivGeorgia53Materials & Chemicals66.2549.4673.4075.95
479HarscoPennsylvania21Professional Services66.2360.2174.3264.22
480Cabot CorporationMassachusetts54Materials & Chemicals66.2165.1971.1162.39
481The HanoverMassachusetts35Financial66.1968.5657.9972.09
482Americold Realty TrustGeorgia35Real Estate & Housing66.1875.8271.6751.13
483CentennialColorado47Energy & Utilities66.1750.3371.0177.23
484American Homes 4 RentCalifornia36Real Estate & Housing66.1260.8074.1163.49
485Equitrans MidstreamPennsylvania48Energy & Utilities66.1156.5579.7362.11
486Avis Budget GroupNew Jersey22Professional Services66.0962.7165.9069.73
487The Container StoreTexas18Retail66.0677.3550.8570.06
488Advanced Drainage SystemsOhio49Energy & Utilities66.0668.0863.5466.64
489QTSKansas37Real Estate & Housing66.0662.2269.3366.69
490Devon EnergyOklahoma50Energy & Utilities65.9365.3867.5664.92
491Installed Building ProductsOhio23Professional Services65.9251.8769.2176.73
492WabtecPennsylvania15Transport & Logistics65.9260.0368.9468.84
493Caesars EntertainmentNevada12Hotels, Dining & Leisure65.8983.1651.2763.31
494Array TechnologiesNew Mexico51Energy & Utilities65.8869.1360.8567.73
495New Jersey ResourcesNew Jersey52Energy & Utilities65.7756.2966.1674.92
496Range ResourcesTexas53Energy & Utilities65.7657.8876.6862.78
497Hostess BrandsKansas41Consumer Goods65.6858.0368.5770.52
498Kontoor BrandsNorth Carolina42Consumer Goods65.6154.3360.6681.90
499Greenbrier CompaniesOregon16Transport & Logistics65.6064.8867.5764.42

  Visit our rankings portal 

Licensing

If your company was listed in the ranking, click here to learn more about the licensing options.METHODOLOGY

THE RANKING AMERICA’S MOST RESPONSIBLE Companies 2023 focuses on a holistic view of corporate responsibility that considers all three pillars of ESG: environment, social and corporate governance. 
In total, 500 companies were identified as America’s Most Responsible Companies.The initial analysis focused on the top 2000 public companies by revenue and banks and insurance companies with total assets exceeding $50 billion. 

The analysis is based on two metrics:
1. Quantitative data from KPI (key performance indicator) research: More than 30 KPIs from the three areas of CSR (corporate social responsibility) were considered for the ranking.
2. The CSR reputation of each company from an extensive survey of 13,000 U.S. residents: Respondents were asked to select companies familiar to them and then to evaluate the company’s CSR performance in general and in the three sub-dimensions: social, environmental and governance.

  Visit our rankings portal 

he selection of the companies and the definition of the evaluation criteria were carried out according to independent journalistic criteria of Newsweek and Statista. The evaluation was carried out by the statistics and market research company Statista. Newsweek and Statista make no claim to the completeness of the companies examined.
The ranking is composed exclusively of U.S. companies that are eligible regarding the criteria described here. A position in the ranking is a positive recognition based on research of publicly available data sources at the time, the information provided in the validation survey and an extensive survey of U.S. residents. The ranking is the result of an elaborate process which, due to the interval of data-collection and analysis, is a reflection of official ESG data from 2020 or 2021. Furthermore, events following November 3, 2022 were not a subject of this survey. As such, the results of this ranking should not be used as the sole source of information for future deliberations. The information provided in this ranking should be considered in conjunction with other available information. The quality of companies that are not included in the ranking is not disputed. For a complete methodology see newsweek.com/amrc-2023 

ewsweek and Statista make no claim to the completeness of the companies examined.
The ranking is composed exclusively of U.S. companies that are eligible regarding the criteria described here. A position in the ranking is a positive recognition based on research of publicly available data sources at the time, the information provided in the validation survey and an extensive survey of U.S. residents. The ranking is the result of an elaborate process which, due to the interval of data-collection and analysis, is a reflection of official ESG data from 2020 or 2021. Furthermore, events following November 3, 2022 were not a subject of this survey. As such, the results of this ranking should not be used as the sole source of information for future deliberations. The information provided in this ranking should be considered in conjunction with other available information. The quality of companies that are not included in the ranking is not disputed. For a complete methodology see newsweek.com/amrc-2023 

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Conservation International: Nature Is Speaking. And She’s Not Happy.

8 10 2014

“Nature doesn’t need people, people need nature.” 

In a series of short films debuting this week for Conservation International, Hollywood celebrities and advertising legend Lee Clow of TWBA Media Arts Lab lend a hand to raise awareness of the importance of protecting, preserving and nurturing the environment – for the good of mankind.

Narrated by various leading actors including Julia Roberts, Harrison Ford, Robert Redford, Ed Norton, Robert Redford, Penelope Cruz, Kevin Spacey, and Ian Somerhalder, each film highlights some aspect of the natural world and represents its point of view about the relationship with humanity.

Ford serves on the Conservation International Board of Directors and has been involved with the non-profit for twenty years.  He called on his celebrity friends to lend their voices to this important campaign.

In commenting on the campaign, Clow told Fast Company’s Co-Create:  “Like so many things right now in our culture and politics, everything seems so polarized that the two extreme ends are the loudest and everyone else in the middle is getting tired and sick of nobody being able to solve anything. That was the hope for this is to be a balanced message that everyone could get on board with.”

The films include the #NatureIsSpeaking hashtag the CI team is encouraging social media discussion with Twitter handles for each of the films’ subjects (@MotherNature_CI, @Ocean_CI, @Rainforest_CI, @Soil_CI, @Water_CI, @Redwood_CI, @CoralReef_CI).

HP, sponsor of the #NatureIsSpeaking hashtag will donate $1 to Conservation International, for every social media mention, up to $1 million.

 





Brandkarma: A new Global Reputation System for Brands

7 03 2014

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“Brands often fall short of their potential to do good – reputation without responsibility. Brandkarma will change that.”

Upendra Shardanand, founder Daylife

Welcome Brandkarma.com – the first social community that will rate and review brands ability to do good in the world.

Consumer research has repeatedly demonstrated that people expect businesses to operate responsibly and to contribute to positive change in the world.  Many people say that if brands fail to operate responsibly, they will stop purchasing the products that the brand provides.

Brandkarma.com was launched to empower consumers to better translate those beliefs into action.  Brandkarma.com allows consumers to see brands holistically – not only the quality of their products but the brand behaviors toward their employees, their community and the planet at large.

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visit brand karma.com here





CCC: Enhanced Reputation Key Goal of CSR Efforts.

17 01 2014

CSRNew reports cites increased funding, senior leadership appointments, management engagement and reputation enhancement goals for corporate citizenship.  The Center for Corporate Citizenship has released its The Profile of the Practice 2013.  The report explores how the environmental, social, and governance (ESG) dimensions of business—corporate citizenship—are managed in today’s business world, and how these practices have evolved since the last report in 2010.

“Corporate citizenship is managed at higher levels, corporate citizenship leaders are better compensated, and more companies establish both board committees and official budgeted departments to manage their programs,” said Katherine Smith, Executive Director, Boston College Center for Corporate Citizenship said in a statement. “These are all signs that CSR continues to be more deeply embedded in business as more executives realize that positive environmental, social and governance measures correlate to positive financial performance, improved reputation, and solid risk management.”

Among the key findings in the survey:

  • More than 70% of companies cited enhanced reputation among the top three business goals they are trying to achieve through their corporate citizenship efforts. The next most frequently cited goals are improving employee retention (45%), improving employee recruitment (41%), attracting new customers (33%), and improving risk management (22%).
  • The chief executive is more involved in developing strategy, setting goals, and communicating corporate citizenship than reported in both 2008 and 2010. More than 25% indicate that their chief executive is highly involved in corporate citizenship program evaluation.
  • Almost 100% of companies have a corporate citizenship budget today, while just 81% reported being budgeted in 2010.
  • Almost 60% of companies have an executive leading corporate citizenship. This is a 74% increase over what was reported in 2010. Close to one-third of corporate citizenship leaders are within one level of the chief executive.

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The survey was conducted in the Fall of 2013 of 231 companies  and their corporate citizenship strategies, operational structures, and business practices were analyzed. 

About the Center for Corporate Citizenship

The Carroll School of Management Center for Corporate Citizenship at Boston College is a membership-based knowledge center. Founded in 1985, the Center has a history of leadership in corporate citizenship research and education. The Center engages more than 400 member companies and more than 10,000 individuals annually to share knowledge and expertise about the practice of corporate citizenship through the Center’s professional development programs, online community, regional programs, and annual conference. The Center is a GRI-Certified Training Partner. For more information, visit the Center’s website at www.BCCorporateCitizenship.org.

 

 

 





National Research Council: Abrupt, near-term impacts to rival dinosaur extinction

10 12 2013

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With little fanfare and a noticeable lack of press coverage, the National Research Council released its report:  Abrupt Impacts of Climate Change: Anticipating Surprises last week.  The 200 page report suggests that a wave of species extinctions rivaling the dinosaurs’ demise might well be coming within the century — and that the time has come to set up early warning systems to detect this and other imminent climate catastrophes.

One of the authors, Anthony Barnosky, made this comment on the report:  “Our report focuses on abrupt change, that is, things that happen within a few years to decades: basically, over short enough time scales that young people living today would see the societal impacts brought on by faster-than-normal planetary changes.”

The study was sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Science Foundation, U.S. intelligence community and the National Academies, which is made up of The National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, Institute of Medicine and National Research Council.

Abrupt Changes Already Underway

Some of the abrupt changes are already taking place, according to the report.

  • The disappearance of late-summer sea ice in the Arctic, with predictions that it may be gone entirely within decades, which “would have potentially large and irreversible effects of various components of the Arctic East Coast system including disruptions in the marine food web, shifts and habitats of summary mammals, and erosion of vulnerable coastlines.”

Because the Arctic region interacts with a large-scale circulation systems of the ocean and atmosphere, changes in the extent of sea ice could cause shifts in climate and weather around the northern hemisphere. The Arctic is also region of increasing economic importance for diverse range of stakeholders, and reductions in Arctic sea ice will bring new legal and political challenges this navigation routes for commercial shipping open and marine access to the region increases for offshore oil and gas development, tourism, fishing and other activities.

  • Rapidly increasing extinction of plant and animal species at a rate already “probably as fast as any warming event in the past 65 million years, and it is projected that its pace over the next 30 to 80 years will continue to be faster and more intense.”   The report cites the following scenarios for species extinction.

If unchecked, habitat destruction, fragmentation, and over-exploitation, even without climate change, could result in a mass extinction within the next few centuries equivalent in magnitude to the one that wiped out the dinosaurs. With the ongoing pressures of climate change, comparable levels of extinction conceivably could occur before the year 2100; indeed, some models show a crash of coral reefs from climate change alone as early as 2060 under certain scenarios.

  • Destabilization of the west Antarctic ice sheet, an “abrupt change of unknown probability,” carries the threat of sea-level rise “at a rate several times faster than those observed today. “

Early Warning System 

In the face of these threats, the report urges development of an Abrupt Change Early Warning System (ACEWS) to closely monitor signals of tipping points drawing near, digest the data and feed it into the best predictive models that can be developed.   “We watch our streets, we watch our banks,” the report’s chief author, climatologist James White of the University of Colorado at Boulder, told the Los Angeles Times. “But we do not watch our environment with the same amount of care and zeal.”  In a press statement releasing the report, Mr. White said “The time has come for us to quit talking and take action.  Right now we don’t know what many of these thresholds are.  But with better information, we will be able to anticipate some major changes before they occur and help reduce the potential consequences.”

The executive summary of the report concludes with this rather dire warning:

“Although there is much to learn about climate change and abrupt impacts, to willingly ignore the threat of abrupt change could lead to more costs, loss of life, suffering and environmental degradation.  The time is here to be serious about the threat of the tipping points so as to better anticipate and prepare ourselves for the inevitable surprises.”





Project Sunlight: Unilever’s Call To Action For Sustainable Living

21 11 2013

Unilever has launched  a worldwide new initiative to motivate millions of people to adopt more sustainable lifestyles.  Launched yesterday on Universal Children’s Day in Brazil, India, Indonesia, the UK and the US, Project Sunlight aims to make sustainable living desirable and achievable by inspiring people, and in particular parents, to join what Unilever sees as a growing community of people who want to make the world a better place for children and future generations.

Project Sunlight was launched with the four-minute film embedded here and created by DAVID Latin America and Ogilvy & Mather London at dawn on November 20th in Indonesia and then follow the sun to India, the UK, Brazil and the US. Additional information can be found at an online hub – www.projectsunlight.com – which brings together the social mission stories of Unilever’s brands across the world, and invites consumers to get involved in doing small things that help their own families, others around the world and the planet.

To mark the launch of Project Sunlight on Universal Children’s Day, Unilever will be helping 2 million children through its ongoing partnerships, providing school meals through the World Food Programme; supporting Save the Children to provide clean, safe drinking water; and improved hygiene through UNICEF.

Ogilvy & Mather Chairman and CEO Miles Young, explains: “Unilever asked us to find a new way to talk about sustainability that would make the benefits real for ordinary people. Project Sunlight is founded on the principle that even small actions can make a big difference and that together, we can create a brighter future.  We are honored to be a part of such a positive and significant movement for the good of our client and our communities.”  Famed film director Erroll Morris directed “Why bring a child into this world?” including moving interviews with expectant parents from around the world.

The project draws on the legacy of Unilever’s founder Lord Leverhulme, who believed that he could change the world with a brand of soap he called Sunlight.

Kudos to Unilever, Ogilvy, DAVID and everyone involved in this important initiative that hits at the heart of the matter: if we can’t work to improve living conditions on our precious planet, how dare you bring a child into this world.





Survey Shows Weak Collaboration Around Sustainability In Companies

11 11 2013

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BSR/GlobeScan of 700+ corporate sustainability executives in companies worldwide shows decreasing levels of collaboration between sustainability functions and other core corporate functions.

Survey respondents note a lower level, and decreasing, engagement between sustainability functions and corporate functions, such as investor relations (with 37 percent of those surveyed saying they engage with investor relations, down 1 point from 2011), human resources (34 percent, down 3 points), R&D (32 percent, down 9 points), marketing (28 percent, down 14 points).  The weakest area of engagement is between corporate sustainability and finance at 16 percent, down 2 points from 2011.  Unless greater collaboration is made in this area, the business case for sustainability and its potential positive impact on financial performance will be very difficult to make.

“The trend toward weaker engagement between sustainability functions and core functions such as finance, marketing, HR, investor relations, and R&D, is concerning.” Chris Coulter, CEO at GlobeScan, noted, “Not only is engagement limited with these strategic areas, but collaboration between them and sustainability teams has declined—in some cases by a significant margin. While there is a clear need for external collaboration, there is an equally important case to be made for greater internal collaboration.”

Additional topline findings from this survey include:

  • When asked to choose which sustainability issues need collaboration the most, climate change and public policy frameworks promoting sustainability are ranked highest.
  • Only one in five companies has fully integrated sustainability into business.
  • Engagement between sustainability functions and corporate functions such as marketing, R&D, and finance remains very low.
  • Collaboration by BSR member companies focuses more often on engagement with NGOs and other businesses than it does on engagement with government.

Fewer companies collaborate often with governments (46 percent) or media (27 percent), both of which are rated as the most difficult partners for collaboration.

21 percent report that their company is close to full integration. A majority say that their company is either about halfway to integration (51 percent), or is just getting started (22 percent).

“The survey reveals both the sense of urgency to address climate change, and the sense that meaningful progress goes well beyond the steps a single company can take,” observed Aron Cramer, President and CEO of BSR.  “No one sector—not business, government, civil society, or consumers—can ‘save us’ from climate change.

 

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One Year After Sandy: Companies Push White House On Climate Action Plan

29 10 2013

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20 leading corporations – including Starbucks, Levis, Unilever and Mars -call on President Obama to follow through on climate change preparedness efforts outlined in the Climate Action Plan announced by the President on June 25th.

The corporate signatories of the letter, which rely on the stability of global supply chains for growth and profitability, cited the economic impacts of severe weather events on company operations and called for ongoing and significant investments to be made in strengthening climate change resiliency both in the United States and the world’s most vulnerable countries. Many of the signatories are members of Business for Innovative Climate & Energy Policy – a group of businesses advocating for meaningful energy and climate legislation.

Critical components of President Obama’s Climate Action Plan included federal investments in climate science, and support for disaster planning and risk management in multiple sectors. On the anniversary of one of the most catastrophic weather events in history, the companies reiterated the need for federal funding of programs and projects that benefit the most vulnerable communities and the businesses they rely on for employment, products and services.

“Our businesses depend upon a resilient infrastructure, resilient communities, and resilient value chains,” the companies wrote in a letter to President Obama today. “In recent years, severe weather events, combined with rising temperatures, have devastated critical infrastructure, decreased crop yields, and threatened water supplies. These trends are being felt globally… We call upon your administration to follow through on commitments for robust support of climate change resilience efforts.”

“Public investment in climate resilience is critical to the economic viability of companies we invest in that rely on consumers, labor, raw materials, and operations located in regions susceptible to extreme weather,” said Bennett Freeman, SVP for Sustainability Research and Policy at Calvert Investments. “We applaud the U.S. government for making investments in resilience and hope to see this strengthened in future years.”

“Extreme weather trends pose challenges to managing reliable supply chains and business planning,” said Anna Walker, Senior Director, Government Affairs and Public Policy at Levi Strauss & Co. “While Levi Strauss & Co. is committed to addressing its climate impact, we believe U.S. government leadership is essential for widespread action on climate resilience to strengthen communities and minimize economic disruption.”

The signatories recognized the Obama Administration’s efforts thus far to address climate change, and expressed support for public and private sector collaboration to continue advancing the implementation of the Climate Action Plan.

“The human and economic costs of severe weather are escalating and it is increasingly important that business and communities integrate climate risk into their operational and decision-making processes,” said Mark Way, Head of Sustainability Americas at Swiss Re America. “As experts on risk, everything we see points to the fact that climate change is something we simply cannot ignore.”





The Aspirational Consumer: 2.5 Billion People Redefining Responsible Consumption

8 10 2013

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A new global consumer study confirms the rise of nearly 2.5 billion consumers globally who are uniting style, social status and sustainability values to redefine consumption.

According to the report by BBMG, GlobeScan and SustainAbility : The 2013 Aspirational Consumer Index – more than one-third of consumers globally (36.4%) identify as Aspirationals, defined by their love of shopping (78%), desire for responsible consumption (92%) and their trust in brands to act in the best interest of society (58%). The study draws from a telephone and in-person survey of more than 21,000 consumers across 21 international markets conducted in April 2013.

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According to Eric Whan, Sustainability Director at GlobeScan, “Aspirationals are materialists who define themselves in part through brands and yet they believe they have a responsibility to purchase products that are good for the environment and society.  By engaging Aspirational consumers, brands can further the shift toward more sustainable consumption and influence behavior change at scale.”

Key characteristics of Aspirational consumers include:

  • Trust in Brands: Nearly six in ten Aspirational consumers globally say they “trust global companies to act in the best interest of society” (58%), compared with 52% of all consumers;
  • Seek Style and Status: Three-fourths of Aspirational consumers say “I want to stand out by the way I look, my style” (73%), compared to 53% of all consumers;
  • Positive Influencers: Nearly nine in ten Aspirational consumers say “I encourage others to buy from socially and environmentally responsible companies” (88%), compared to 63% of all consumers;
  • Empowered Shoppers: Nearly eight in ten Aspirational consumers say “shopping for new things excites me” (78%), compared to 48% of all consumers, and believe they “can change how a company behaves based on my purchase decisions” (78%), compared with 66% of all consumers;
  • Responsible Consumers: Nine in ten Aspirational consumers say “I believe we need to consume less to preserve the environment for future generations” (92%), compared to 75% of all consumers, and that they are “willing to pay more for products produced in a socially and environmentally responsible way” (91%) compared to 64% of all consumers;
  • Young and Urban: Demographically, Aspirational consumers make up the largest percentage of Millennial (40%) and GenX (37%) generations, compared to 32% and 33% in the general population, respectively, and nearly six and ten (59%) live in cities; and
  • Strength in Emerging Markets: Countries with the largest populations of Aspirational consumers include China (46%), Nigeria (45%), Pakistan (44%), India (42%), Australia (41%), Canada (40%), Indonesia (38%), Greece (37%), France (36%), USA (36%), Turkey (35%) and the UK (34%).

“Driven by young, optimistic consumers in emerging markets and amplified by technology and social media’s influence, Aspirationals represent a powerful shift in sustainable consumption from obligation to desire,” said Raphael Bemporad, co-founder and chief strategy officer at brand innovation consultancy BBMG. “With Aspirationals, the sustainability proposition has changed from being the ‘right thing to do’ to being the ‘cool thing to do,’ and brands have a profound opportunity to harness sustainable design and societal values to inspire the next generation of commerce and create positive impact in the world.”

“For decades, green marketers have been speaking to the wrong consumers, assuming that by engaging the most committed ‘advocates’ we would create significant business growth, cultural relevance and change at scale,” Bemporad added. “What makes Aspirationals so compelling is that they combine an authentic commitment to sustainability with a love of shopping, design and social status, aligning economic, cultural and social forces to shift the way we shop.”

“With 2.5 billion consumers worldwide, Aspirationals offer an important opportunity to redefine sustainable consumption,” said Mark Lee, Executive Director at SustainAbility. “Like never before, brands can engage Aspirationals to pioneer new models and practices that can deliver economic growth while reducing negative impacts on the environment.”

 

Read the original press release on CSR Wire.





Stay or Stall? Great Lakes Oil Shipping On Hold….For Now.

24 09 2013

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This week it was announced that a proposed crude oil shipping terminal on Lake Superior has been put on hold.   The proposed terminal would have shipped crude oil from the Bakken fields in North Dakota to be loaded onto oil tankers to be shipped to the East Coast.  As preposterous as this idea was in the first place, public pressure needs to be raised and continued to ensure that this proposal never comes up again.  Be it feasible or not.

Adolph Ojard, executive director of the Duluth Seaway Port Authority, was quoted in an article in the Minneapolis Star Tribune:   “It was one of those things that was a trial balloon being floated out there.  Economically, I don’t know if it really makes sense to move crude oil on the Great Lakes given the current conditions. It’s more efficient to move it by rail and pipeline.”

Thank god.  But economic conditions change and this idea needs to be permanently put to bed through public pressure and legislation.  There is much more at stake than economics.

Consider the Facts:

The Great Lakes make up the largest body of fresh water on Earth.

The Great Lakes contain one fifth of the freshwater surface on the planet, some 6 quadrillion gallons and 5,500 cubic miles of water.

The United States draws more than 40 billion gallons of water from the Great Lakes every day.

More than 35 million people rely on the Great Lakes for drinking water.

The Great Lakes support a $7 billion fishery industry and $16 billion tourism industry.

More than 800 toxic contaminants have already been identified in the Great Lakes water and sediment.

Even with these facts in hand, oil thirsty prospectors would consider shipping oil across this precious freshwater resource.   Many, many people would be thirsty if this plan goes ahead and inevitably awry.

Dangerous Waters

The combination of severe storms and unpredictable underwater topography make the Great Lakes on of the most dangerous bodies of water for navigation in the world.  The Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum approximates 6,000 ships have been lost – while historian and mariner Mark Thompson has estimated that the total number of wrecks is likely more than 25,000. In the modern period between 1816, when the Invincible was lost, to the sinking of the Fitzgerald in 1975, the Whitefish Point area alone has claimed at least 240 ships.  Proposed oil tankers necessarily would sail past Whitefish Point on Lake Superior from the terminal in Superior, Wisconsin to the Soo Locks.

What We Learned In Alaska

Wildlife, economies and people are still recovering from the devastating natural and economic disaster from a single wreck of the oil tanker Exxon Valdez in Prince William Sound in Alaska.  It is considered to be one of the most devastating human-caused environmental disasters. The Valdez spill was the largest ever in US waters until the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in terms of volume.  Prince William Sound’s remote location, accessible only by helicopter, plane, or boat, made government and industry response efforts difficult and severely taxed existing plans for response.   Many parts of the Great Lakes are equally inaccessible.

In 1991, following the collapse of the local marine population (particularly clams, herring, and seals) the Chugach Alaska Corporation, filed for bankruptcy protection. It has since recovered. According to several studies funded by the state of Alaska, the spill had both short-term and long-term economic effects. These included the loss of sports fisheries, reduced tourism, and an estimate of what economists call “existence value“, which is the value to the public of a pristine Prince William Sound.  The economy of the city of Cordova, Alaska was adversely affected after the spill damaged stocks of fish in the area. Several residents, including one former mayor, committed suicide after the spill.

But the disaster that was the Exxon Valdez happened in salt water.  People don’t drink salt water.

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 Share this article with any Great Lakes residents and lovers that you know.  Write your Congressman.  Start your own campaign.  If you are concerned about your future and the future of your family, please get engaged to prevent crude oil shipping on the Great Lakes.





United Nations: CEOs say sustainability less important.

24 09 2013

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In a massive new study which interviewed 1,000 CEOs around the world, The United Nations and Accenture report that only 32% of CEOs believe the global economy is on track to meet the demands of a growing population within global environmental and resource constraints.  Alarmingly, the number of CEOs of saying that sustainability is “very important” to their business success dropped to 45%, a decline from 54% just three years ago.

The third United Nations Global Compact – Accenture CEO Study On Sustainability 2013 points to CEOs concern about an uncertain global economic climate as directly impacting the urgency of addressing sustainable business operations.  Despite the report that 63% of CEOs expect sustainability to transform their business within five years – and 76% believe that embedding sustainability into core business will drive revenue growth and new opportunities – many struggle with market expectations, investor pressure and the difficulty of measuring the business value of sustainability.

The report demonstrates how the world’s CEOs are conflicted on the extent to which they believe that business is making sufficient efforts to address sustainability. with 33% agreeing business is making the acceptable effort, while 38% disagree.  See the report chart below:

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In an executive summary of the CEO survey, the authors conclude:

“CEOs clearly recognize the scale of the global challenge—but may not yet see the urgency or the incentive for their own businesses to do more and to have a greater impact. This disconnect suggests that a gap persists between the approach to sustainability of the majority of companies globally—an approach centered on philanthropy, compliance, mitigation and the license to operate—and the approach being adopted by leading companies, focused on innovation, growth and new sources of value.”

Other key findings in the report include:

  • 83% of CEOs see an increase in efforts by governments and policy makers to provide an enabling environment for the private sector as integral to advancing sustainability.
  • 85% of CEOs demand clearer policy and market signals to support green growth.
  • Only 29% of CEOs regard climate change as one of the most important sustainability challenges for the future of their business
  • And just 14% regard water sanitation as an important issue for their business to address.

Clearly the lack of progress on the global economy and the failure of governments and regulators to provide consistent sustainability frameworks are holding back CEOs from focusing their full attention on the long-term issues of sustainability and threatened natural resources.  As the report highlights, more urgency is needed:

“As business leaders across the world come together this year to set out an architecture to align business action with global priorities, there is a clear and unequivocal call for greater ambition, greater speed and greater impact.”

– United Nations Global Compact

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Carbon Trust: 2/3 of public unable to name businesses that take sustainability seriously.

23 09 2013

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In a recent survey of more than 1,800 adults in the United Kingdom, The Carbon Trust Fund found that 68% of people were unable to name a company that is taking sustainability seriously.

In addition, just 5% of respondents see businesses as being most effective in helping the environment.  Despite the significant efforts many companies across the world are making to turn their business operations to more responsible and sustainable entities, the UK study underscores how poorly those companies are communicating their actions.

According to Tom Delay, the chief executive of Carbon Trust:

“While it’s clear that consumers still care about the environmental future, their perspective on where the responsibility falls is skewed. It cannot be solely down to environmental groups to shoulder the weight of protecting our planet’s natural resources. Businesses have an enormous role to play here and need to be seen to be doing their part.  As businesses look for more ways to grow, sustainability should become a golden opportunity for investment, allowing them to become more resilient to future environmental resource shocks and to cut their costs and grow their revenues. The smart companies will invest now and put sustainability inside their businesses.”

The same survey of UK adults did have some encouraging signs regarding concern for the environment.   The demand for green products appears to be increasing with only 6% saying they are less likely to buy a sustainable product and/or service than five years ago while almost three in ten (27%) said they are more likely.   Increased concern about the personal impact of what they buy on the environment was the most important reason for this (45%) and 43% of the public surveyed said they lead a more sustainable life than five years ago.





CDP Report: World’s Largest Companies Doing Little On Climate Change

17 09 2013

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“As countries around the world seek economic growth, strong employment and safe environments, corporations have a unique responsibility to deliver that growth in a way that uses natural resources wisely. The opportunity is enormous and it is the only growth worth having.” – Paul Simpson, Chief Executive Officer, CDP

Fifty of the 500 largest listed companies in the world are responsible for nearly three quarters of the group’s 3.6 billion metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions, so finds the CDP Global 500 Climate Change Report 2013 released this week. The carbon emitted by these 50 highest emitting companies, which primarily operate in the energy, materials and utilities sectors, has risen 1.65% to 2.54 billion metric tons over the past four years.

The report is co-written by CDP, formerly known as the Carbon Disclosure Project, and professional services firm PwC. It provides the most authoritative evaluation of corporate progress on climate change.

Inadequate momentum to mitigate climate change is also true of the biggest emitters found in each of the ten sectors covered in the report. Titled Sector insights: what is driving climate change action in the world’s largest companies, the new publication includes industry-specific analysis which shows that the five highest emitting companies from each sector have seen their emissions increase by an average of 2.3% since 2009.

Guardian Sustainable Business offered a biting analysis of the report, concluding companies are making little progress in addressing climate change.

“For all the talk of companies taking the threat of climate change seriously, the latest evidence shows the corporate sector is failing to respond in a meaningful way to the threat of environmental catastrophe,” wrote GSB’s Jo Confino.

Paul Simpson, CEO at CDP says: “Many countries are demonstrating signs of recovery following the global economic downturn. However, clear scientific evidence and increasingly severe weather events are sending strong signals that we must pursue routes to economic prosperity whilst reducing emissions of greenhouse gases. It is imperative that big emitters improve their performance in this regard and governments provide more incentives to make this happen.” 

While the biggest emitters present the greatest opportunity for large-scale change, the report identifies opportunities for all Global 500 companies to help build resilience to climate and policy shocks by significantly reducing the amount of carbon dioxide they produce each year. For example, the emissions from nearly half (47%) of the most carbon intensive activities that companies identify across their value chains are yet to be measured. The lack of detailed reporting and information of GHGs from sources related to company activities (Scope 3 emissions), as opposed to those from sources owned or directly controlled by them, may lead companies to underestimate their full carbon impact.

Malcolm Preston, global lead, sustainability and climate change, PwC says: “The report underlines how customers, suppliers, employees, governments and society in general are becoming more demanding of business. It raises questions for some organizations about whether they are focused on sustaining growth in the long term, or just doing enough to recover growth until the next issue arises. With the initial IPCC report only weeks away corporate emissions are still rising. Either business action increases, or the risk is regulation overtakes them.”

Companies that demonstrate a strong commitment to managing their impact on the environment are generating improved financial and environmental results. Analysis of the corporations leading on climate progress, as based on CDP’s acclaimed methodology and including BMW, Nestlé and Cisco Systems, suggests that they generate superior stock performance. Further, the businesses that offer employees monetary incentives related to energy consumption and carbon emissions are 18% more successful at accomplishing reductions.

The CDP Global 500 Climate Change Report 2013 is available to download free. It launches this week at CDP’s annual Global Climate Forum which is broadcast live online. The public disclosures of climate change information from Global 500 companies taking part in CDP this year are also available on the CDP website. Over 4,500 businesses in markets around the world have disclosed through CDP this year. Their data will be disseminated to investors via various channels, such as Bloomberg terminals, where it is downloaded an average of 1 million times every six weeks.

Read the CDP Report here

Adapted from an original article at Sustainable Industries blog here





Made Movement: Buy 5% more American made products for 1 million jobs

20 08 2013

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Alex Bogusky, our old friend – reformed advertising creative director turned consumer advocate, has launched a new campaign for the Made Movement challenging Americans to buy 5% more American made products.  The result of the Made Movement 5% pledge will yield one million jobs for Americans.

Bogusky has created a video explaining the campaign and asks viewers to share the video with two people.  You can watch the Million Jobs Project video here.

According to an article in USA Today, Bogusky says “there’s hippie value now to Made in America.  Red, white and blue are the new green.”  But he cautions in the video, “Sometimes, even if you think a brand is American, even if there’s an American flag on the package, it might not be made here.  You have to pay attention.”

You can read the full article in USA Today here.

USA Today: Ad guru attacks outsourcing, seeks to save jobs