Foams used in car seats and mattresses are hard to recycle – we made a plant-based version that avoids polyurethane’s health risks, too

19 01 2023

The authors with two students show methods for recycling bio-based foam. Clemson UniversityCC BY-ND

By Srikanth Pilla, Professor of Engineering, Clemson University and James Sternberg, Research Assistant Professor of Automotive Engineering, Clemson University

The big idea

A new plant-based substitute for polyurethane foam eliminates the health risk of the material, commonly found in insulation, car seats and other types of cushioning, and it’s more environmentally sustainable, our new research shows.

Polyurethane foams are all around you, anywhere a lightweight material is needed for cushioning or structural support. But they’re typically made using chemicals that are suspected carcinogens.

Polyurethanes are typically produced in a very fast reaction between two chemicals made by the petrochemical industry: polyols and isocyanates. While much work has gone into finding replacements for the polyol component of polyurethane foams, the isocyanate component has largely remained, despite its consequences for human healthBio-based foams can avoid that component.

Four chunks of bio-based foam, looking a lot like brownies on a tray.
These bio-based foams avoid the need for petroleum products. Srikanth Pilla, CC BY-ND

We created a durable bio-based foam using lignin, a byproduct of the paper pulping industry, and a vegetable oil-based curing agent that introduces flexibility and toughness to the final material.

At the heart of the innovation is the ability to create a system that “gels,” both in the sense that the materials are compatible with one another and that they physically create a gel quickly so that the addition of a foaming agent can create the lightweight structure associated with polyurethane foams.

Lignin is a difficult material to convert into a usable chemical, given its complicated and heterogeneous structure. We used this structure to create a network of bonds that enabled what we believe is the world’s first lignin-based nonisocyanate foam.

The foam can also be recycled because it has bonds that can unzip the chemical network after it has formed. The main components used to produce the foam can then be extracted and used again.

Why it matters

Polyurethane foams are the world’s sixth-most-produced plastic yet among the least recycled materials. They are also designed for durability, meaning they will remain in the environment for several generations. 

They contribute to the plastic waste problem for the world’s oceans, land and air, and to human health problems. Today, plastics can be found in virtually every creature in the terrestrial ecosystem. And since most plastics are made from petroleum products, they’re connected to fossil fuel extraction, which contributes to climate change.

The fully bio-based origin of our foams addresses the issue of carbon neutrality, and the chemical recycling capability ensures that waste plastic has a value attached to it so it is less likely to be thrown away. Ensuring waste has value is a hallmark of the circular approach to manufacturing – attaching a monetary value to things tends to decrease the amount that is discarded.

Illustration shows the recycling process including unzipping the molecules.
How the chemicals in bio-based foams can be recycled and reused. Srikanth Pilla, CC BY-ND

We hope the nature of these foams inspires others to design plastics with the full life cycle in mind. Just as plastics need to be designed according to properties of their initial application, they also need to be designed to avoid the final destination of 90% of plastic waste: landfills and the environment.

What’s next

Our initial versions of bio-based foams produce a rigid material suitable for use in foam-core boards used in construction or for insulation in refrigerators. We have also created a lightweight and flexible version that can be used for cushioning and packaging applications. Initial testing of these materials showed good durability in wet conditions, increasing their chance of gaining commercial adoption. 

Polyurethane foams are used so extensively because of their versatility. The formulation that we initially discovered is being translated to create a library of precursors that can be mixed to produce the desired properties, like strength and washability, in each application.

To see the original post, follow this link. https://theconversation.com/foams-used-in-car-seats-and-mattresses-are-hard-to-recycle-we-made-a-plant-based-version-that-avoids-polyurethanes-health-risks-too-192154

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Proctor & Gamble: Building Citizenship Into How We Do Business

18 01 2023

P&G Releases 2022 Citizenship Report • Reposted: January 18, 2023

In today’s complex world, we know it has never been more important for P&G to step up as a responsible corporate citizen. This means delivering sustainable growth and value creation and strengthening the communities where we live and work, while balancing the needs of those we serve and support — from our consumers and retail customers to our employees and shareholders.

That’s why we’re building citizenship into how we do business, every day. From supporting people who rely on our superior performing products and services, to using our global reach and scale to deliver Acts of Good that help communities grow and thrive, we are united in our efforts to be a Force for Growth and a Force for Good across our citizenship focus areas: Community ImpactEquality & Inclusion and Environmental Sustainability and underpinned by our commitment to Ethics and Corporate Responsibility.

Our 2022 Citizenship Report shares our ongoing progress and commitment to making a difference for the billions of people we serve every day and the planet we call home.

Here are just a few of the different ways in our fiscal year that we have stepped up to inspire lasting and meaningful impact for our employees, through our brands and with our partners.

A child holding two bags with Tide logos on them, an orange table behind her.

Supporting Families After Natural Disasters

We know that in moments of crisis, everyday experiences like having clean clothes or a supply of diapers become health and hygiene necessities. That’s why this year, as devastating floods hit communities around the world, including Kentucky (U.S.), British Columbia (Canada) and throughout much of Pakistan, we came together with partners like Matthew 25:Ministries, GlobalMedic and HOPE charities to provide vital relief support to the communities most impacted. Learn more about our disaster relief efforts.

Landscape of a waterway, tall grass, and hilly terrain. A setting sun to the side.

Protecting Our Shared Home

We are committed to achieving Net Zero greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions across our operations and supply chain by 2040, driving greater circularity for plastics, helping build a water positive future and protecting the long-term health of natural ecosystems.

From working with partners in water-stressed areas to support solutions that will result in meaningful benefits to help build a Water Positive Future, to protecting the endangered Malayan tiger population with the World Wildlife Fund Malaysia, we’re acting with partners around the world to ensure a healthy planet for present and future generations. Learn more about the impact we’re making for our shared home.

A child at a dinner table holding a notebook with hand-colored symbols, pictures and the name "Yeong Joo." An adult points to it.

Creating Visibility and Addressing Bias

We aim to create a society where equality and inclusion are achievable for all. Through initiatives like Can’t Cancel Pride, we’re celebrating the unique stories that unite the LGBTQ+ community, while raising funds for the LGBTQ+ organizations that create local impact. We’re also continuing to use our voice to spark dialogue and bring communities together, as we did with The Name, a film that encourages people to learn how to pronounce Asian American Pacific Islander names. Read more about the actions we’re taking to create a more equal world here.

A soccer team posing with arms raised. Team banners in front and back sides "Power up the Capitan within you."

Acting for Tomorrow’s Leaders

We know that the young people inheriting our businesses, communities and planet are already inspiring change today. That’s why we’re helping nurture and grow the next generation through initiatives like the Hispanic Star’s Capitanes del Futuro, which provides future Hispanic leaders access to role models and essential resources within the soccer ecosystem. To create opportunities for moving women forward in leadership, our gender equality partner Vital Voices has created a unique training opportunity for young women from Argentina, Brazil, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Mexico, and Panama. Read more about the efforts we’re making for future generations.

An adult and baby sitting on the floor reading a book. An upholstered chair and window behind them. A box of "Pampers" in the corner.

Addressing Health & Hygiene Inequalities

Supporting health equity is one of the greatest ways to create community impact. That’s why we’re taking action through our brands to create equal access to essential health and hygiene products, care and services around the world. This includes:

  • Pampers partnering with healthcare professionals to address Black maternal health disparities.
  • Oral B helping Close the Smile Gap by working with partners to offer free oral health care for families in need.
  • Always helping End Period Poverty for the 1 in 5 girls who miss school due to lack of period products.

Learn more about the how our brands are acting to move communities forward.

Doing good is in our DNA as a company. For decades we’ve been creating impact across the world. This is only possible by working closely with our incredible partners, whose essential expertise and resources, including deep knowledge of and access to local communities, enable us to help create positive impact together.

In this season of reflection and gratitude, we’re especially thankful for all the people and partners across the world who have joined us to help make a difference in communities through so many Acts of Good in 2022 and throughout the years.

As 2023 approaches, we remain deeply committed to doing our part as a corporate citizen by inspiring and supporting the actions needed to address our collective challenges and to create sustained impact, now and for the future.

Learn how we are continuing to drive solutions that make a difference for people and our planet in our 2022 Citizenship Report and on our social media using #ActsOfGood.





Why Macy’s and furniture companies are paying more attention to responsible sourcing

18 01 2023

Photo: Macy’s

By Melissa Daniels from Modern Retail • Reposted: January 18, 2022

In September 2022, Macy’s rolled out its first-ever wood-sourcing policy for its furniture sales after more than 150 years in business.

It requires the use of responsibly sourced wood or recycled or reclaimed materials. And it also prohibits the use of timber that has been harvested illegally or from threatened areas, among other restrictions. At the outset, the policy covers wood-based products in Macy’s private labels, while buyers will use the policy as a guide for onboarding new suppliers and brands. 

“We’re really thinking about this policy first from the products that we own and buy, and where we can continue to expand it across our assortment,” said Keelin Evans, vice president of sustainability at Macy’s.

The policy follows Macy’s $5 billion commitment announced in March 2022 to become more sustainable in its policies and practices. It also rolled out a new cotton sourcing policy to ensure cotton isn’t harvested by underage workers or those in forced conditions. 

But Macy’s is far from alone among furniture companies paying close attention to sourcing amid heightened consumer awareness against “fast furniture.” Wayfair, in October 2022, launched a new section to showcase products that meet sustainability certifications. And Crate and Barrel, in August 2022, put out a new sustainability policy that includes ensuring 60% of textiles are Certified Preferred Fibers by 2025.

Macy’s also doubled its score from 9 to 18 on the Sustainable Furnishings Council and National Wildlife Federation’s 2022 Wood Furniture Scorecard — it was among 37% of companies on the list that scored higher than they did the year before.

Part of what’s motivating brands is increasing recognition from shoppers about the environmental impact of production: the eco-friendly furniture market hit $43.26 billion in 2022 with an expected CAGR of 8.6% through 2030, per a recent Grand View Research report

“Rising awareness among consumers towards sustainable production of furniture products has largely influenced the adoption of eco-friendly furniture in residential spaces,” the report said. 

From a retailer’s perspective, though, getting more responsibly sourced materials can be an uphill battle. For example, Evans said that it took about two years to develop the wood policy. And it will take time to implement it across the brands’ product assortment. 

“Furniture has long lead times. And sustainability is not about changing things necessarily overnight, but really working with your partners and your suppliers so that this can start to show up more and more,” Evans said. 

Gaining access 

Conor Coghlan, co-founder and CEO of Hoek Home, launched the DTC brand with the goal of creating easy-to-assemble furniture while minimizing the use of plastic waste. Products include side tables, desks, benches and chairs and Coghlan said the brand aims to keep the prices affordable as possible — a flat desk goes for $495, with a bundle that includes additional shelves for $795.

Some parts of its products use high density poly ethylene, which comes from recycled milk jugs. It also uses sustainably sourced plywood that’s Forest Stewardship Council-certified, indicating responsible sourcing. 

One of the challenges with these materials, though, is reliable sourcing. When the brand launched as a Kickstarter in late 2020, there were a plethora of options, Coghlan said. But when supply chain issues kicked in during 2021, suppliers served larger clients first.

“For small companies who are ordering $8,000 or $10,000 worth of postconsumer [materials] instead of $800,000, they just weren’t answering our emails. So it got more difficult,” Coghlan said. 

Hoek also aims to source as locally as possible, relying more on U.S-based manufacturers rather than foreign birch or materials. But that can put added cost on the product — and drive the price point higher for consumers. 

Still, it’s a balance that Coghlan is willing to try to find in light of widespread concerns about climate change and environmental protection. 

“I think it’s important, as we kind of grow up as businesses, that we just seem to be responsible and care for the environment and make the right, sustainable choices,” he said.

Manufacturing monitoring

With much production happening overseas, many furniture brands rely on third parties to monitor manufacturers and facilities.

Evans from Macy’s said the wood and cotton sourcing policies build on top of existing protocols. The brand regularly monitors its global supply chain with social compliance teams located throughout Asia.

It also relies on third-party auditors that visit factories every 18 months to ensure that suppliers and factories are adhering with the brand’s code of conduct, Evans said, particularly with regard to how workers are treated.

“When we actually identify issues with partners, we’re really all about remediation plans, corrective action plans, continuous improvement and working together,” she said. “So if we identify anything, we can make improvements and actually ensure that they’re having a better working experience and they’re being cared for.”

Barbora Samieian, co-founder of the Canadian DTC furniture brand Sundays, said the brand relies on site visits and quality control teams on the ground with its factories in China, Vietnam, India and Eastern Europe. Working with manufacturers that are using responsibly sourced products, though, typically means a higher price point for the end product. Sundays makes living, dining and bedroom furniture priced in the mid-range; its best-selling white oak Field dining table going for $2,190 while a four-piece sectional ranges from $4,670 to $5,180. 

Sometimes, having a sustainability-first mind, it means there might be a product that doesn’t pass muster: for example, a recent stool design out of Europe was left out of a new collection because it did not meet California’s Proposition 65 environmental guidelines.

But sustainability at Sundays also means paying close attention the longevity of pieces, with a focus on designs that can fit with many aesthetics and are built with long-lasting materials like solid wood. 

“We’d rather our customers have a fewer number of pieces that are sort of workhorse items in their homes that can be multipurpose, rather than expanding to huge numbers of SKUs,” she said. 

But Sundays is wary of greenwashing, Samieian said. Much of the wood used in Sundays products is certified by the Forest Stewardship Council, which is a third-party nonprofit designation that ensures timber comes from responsibly managed forests. For it rugs, it relies on certifications from GoodWeave, which verifies products were made without child labor. Still, the brand is careful not to make too many claims for the purpose of marketing or wooing customers who are in the market for an eco-friendly product.

“We’re working really hard behind the scenes and with our partners and making strides and making progress,” she said. “We believe we have to do the right things first, then start talking about it.”

It also means being in a higher price bracket, Samieian said.

“We’ve really focused on solid wood and that’s more expensive and that means we have to play in a certain price point,” she said.

To see the original post, follow this link: https://www.modernretail.co/operations/why-macys-and-furniture-companies-are-paying-more-attention-to-responsible-sourcing/





Apologies from Southwest Fall Flat Amid Lack of Purpose and Positive Change

17 01 2023

A logjam of Southwest 737s on December 27, 2022 at Santa Barbara Municipal Airport. On a typical day, there are six Southwest arrivals and 6 departures at Santa Barbara, and rarely more than one of the airline’s 737 at the airport at the same time. Photo: Glenn Beltz

By Riya Anne Polcastro from Triple Pundit • Reposted: January 17, 2023

Southwest is attempting to appease holiday travelers who were stranded in the airline’s latest fiasco with frequent flier miles and a mediocre, excuse-laden apology — but its pilots’ union (Southwest Airlines Pilots Association, SWAPA) is having none of it. They’ve called leadership out — referring to executive management as a cult in a letter that lists the ways their failures have led to the brand’s persistent problems. Instead of investing in much-needed technological upgrades and staffing, the letter accuses the airline of “maximizing shareholder return” at their expense. Like all corporate entities, Southwest has a duty to its employees and customers first. The airline’s massive disruptions will likely continue until it recognizes the need for corporate responsibility and purpose beyond enriching shareholders and stock buybacks.
 
Extreme winter weather caused a wave of cancellations across airlines this holiday season — although none weathered it quite as badly as Southwest. Over 15,000 flights were scratched by the transportation giant from December 22nd through the 30th. But it wasn’t just the ice and snow that did them in. As NPR and other news outlets reported, the raging “tripledemic” had many workers out sick — then to top it off Southwest’s ancient staff scheduling software just couldn’t handle the crisis.
 
What’s worse, though, is that none of this is a surprise to anyone at the airline. Union pilots have been begging leadership to upgrade their technology for years. “I fear that we are one thunderstorm, one ATC event, one router brownout from a complete meltdown. Whether that’s Thanksgiving, or Christmas, or New Year, that’s the precarious situation we are in,” Casey Murray, SWAPA President,  is quoted as saying in November, not long before the meltdown.
 
In fact, this isn’t Southwest’s first self-inflicted disaster. An issue with air traffic control in Jacksonville was felt around the country in October 2021 when the incident had 29 percent of the airline’s flights canceled or temporarily grounded in cities nationwide. Additionally, 2,300 flights were canceled in July 2016 when the airline’s routers went out and issues in 2014 caused 130 flights to be canceled out of Chicago during the month of January. “Systemwide meltdowns at Southwest Airlines have been increasing in frequency and magnitude over the past 15 years,” according to the letter — which was signed by SWAPA’s 2nd Vice President  Captain Tom Nekouei.
 
Nekouei’s main point throughout the letter is that a cultural shift happened at Southwest when Garry Kelly assumed the top position, noting that during that time the company rewarded shareholders with roughly $12 billion and Kelly’s compensation package went up 700 percent. Although he is no longer CEO, Nekouei asserts that Kelly’s influence still dominates the airline’s corporate culture.
 
Of the lack of investment in technological upgrades needed to keep flights running, Nekouei wrote: “Share buybacks that were once illegal, that provide no benefit for the Company itself while artificially inflating share prices (thus inflating stock-based executive compensation) and sent the clear message that the Company has excess cash on hand but that the CEO thinks there is no better place for investment of capital within his Company.”
 
Nekouei further noted that while nothing tangible has been done to fix the structural and technological problems, “we continue to receive saccharine corporate-communications- department-written and legal-counsel reviewed ‘we’re sorry’ and ‘I love you’ meaningless and generic messages from SWA corporate executives.” And, while these apologies ring hollow right along with the measly 25,000 frequent flier points Southwest has offered those travelers who were caught in the worst of the mess, Nekouei offered a solution — a return to the values and purpose the airline was founded on:

“You put your employees first. If you truly treat your employees that way, they will treat your customers well, your customers will come back, and that’s what makes your shareholders happy. So there’s no constituency at war with any other constituency. Ultimately, it’s shareholder value that you’re producing.” — Herb Kelleher

To see the original post, follow this link: https://www.triplepundit.com/story/2023/apologies-southwest-purpose/763871





Asia: Marketing Must Be Radically Reimagined To Achieve 2030 Sustainable Development Goals

17 01 2023

Dentsu and Kantar’s Sustainable Transformation Practice launch flagship study into the role APAC marketers play in achieving corporate sustainability ambitions.  

SUBMITTED BY DENTSU INTERNATIONAL• Reposted January 17, 2023

Graph depicting how Marketing and Insights departments lag behind other business divisions when it comes to executing and measuring progress on their sustainability objectives
DENTSU AND KANTAR’S SPECIAL REPORT ON CORPORATE SUSTAINABILITY HAS REVEALED THAT MARKETING AND INSIGHTS DEPARTMENTS LAG BEHIND OTHER BUSINESS DIVISIONS WHEN IT COMES TO EXECUTING AND MEASURING PROGRESS ON THEIR SUSTAINABILITY OBJECTIVES.
  • Marketing a Better Future is Asia-Pacific’s first study into marketers’ role in sustainability. 
  • The newly identified organisational intention-action gap is as big a challenge as the consumer intention-action gap to achieve 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs.)
  • Radically reimagining the role of marketing to make sustainable transformation its organising principle could help achieve 40-70% reductions in greenhouse gasses.  

SINGAPORE, January 11, 2023 /CSRwire/ -Dentsu and Kantar today launch Marketing a Better Future, a flagship study exploring the role APAC marketers play in achieving corporate sustainability ambitions and SDGs.  

With the exponential growth of Asian economies, spending power is moving East with the region shaping global consumption trends. This gives Asian consumers and companies a new and unique responsibility, especially as the region is expected to bear the brunt of climate-related catastrophes. Consumer behaviour urgently needs to shift to more sustainable habits and lifestyles. According to Kantar’s latest Global Issues Barometer, climate issues are a key concern with nearly 60% of consumers globally saying they experience eco-anxiety which is driving increased consciousness and desire for action. In tandem, system-level changes are needed to reach global sustainability targets and ensure the planet’s future. There is no doubt that businesses, brands and their agency partners are at a nexus of need and opportunity. As the bridge between brands and consumers, marketers have a unique opportunity, and therefore the responsibility, to be generational agents of change influencing consumer behaviour, as well as driving customer-informed innovation.

Marketers are failing, however, to grasp the opportunity. Dentsu and Kantar’s inaugural study of over 70 brand marketers in 12 markets across Asia-Pacific found that only one in three (34%) marketing and insights teams are ‘executing against their sustainability plans and measuring progress’. This compares unfavourably to 46% in supply chain, and 51% in corporate strategy. The new study identified two significant intention-action gaps, the consumer intention-action gap and the organisational intention-action gap, where marketers’ challenges are rooted.

In order to achieve deep, needle-moving advancement in sustainability, the study found marketing functions need a philosophical revamp: to be given a mandate to drive innovation beyond short-term sales KPIs, to create growth that is good for society and the planet as well as business. Corporate sustainability transformation and sustainable consumption need to become the organising principle around which marketing functions. The study predicts that by making this radical change, brands will be able to drive the behaviour and lifestyle shifts required to achieve the 40% – 70% reductions in greenhouse gas emissions that the sixth IPCC assessment report estimates as achievable.

Dominic Powers, Chief Growth Officer, dentsu Asia Pacific, said, “Meaningful progress in sustainability requires an ecosystem level effort where businesses, consumers and civic society, policy makers, regulators and capital providers work in harmony. Marketers must not only be empowered by businesses to drive innovation that can fuel deep change, but they must also revamp the entire philosophy behind the way the function is designed, which is predicated on selling more. At dentsu we design the ‘what’s next’ for brands. It is clear that sustainable consumption has to be the organising principle of marketing teams, who must now instead focus on inspiring people everywhere to a new way of sustainable living. To do this, brands and marketers must reframe their constituents to include ecosystem partners that co-own the sector’s value chain and its carbon footprint. By positioning themselves as the change agent between the larger ecosystem, customers and their company, marketing teams will be uniquely positioned to drive relevant, resonant, step-change innovation that will help ensure a sustainable future for us all.”  

Trezelene Chan, Head, Sustainability Practice, Kantar APAC added, “We already know that the consumer intention-action gap is a problem for marketers, with 56% identifying it as a major challenge. Only 17% of Asian consumers actively change their behaviour to be more sustainable, despite 98% of Asians saying they will. Our study reveals, however, that the organizational intention-action gap is an equally important challenge to be addressed. Although 73% of marketers believe sustainability is important for business continuity and value growth, the study uncovered tactical and fundamental barriers that hinder marketers from taking on meaningful sustainable leadership. These include focus on short-term sales growth targets above all other KPIs, lack of clarity within the marketing function around metrics of success in relation to sustainability goals, and lack of adequate resources or capability building for sustainability within the marketing function. Innovation, collaboration and ownership across the different business functions against a clear set of sustainability goals will be required. Sustainability initiatives by the brand need to address consumers’ and the planet’s needs holistically and simultaneously. This means a whole new mindset for marketers and their corporate leaders.”  

Download the report here.

To see the original posts, follow this link: https://www.csrwire.com/press_releases/764006-marketing-must-be-radically-reimagined-achieve-2030-sustainable-development

For more information, contact:

Anna Lake, Marketing & Communications Director Asia Pacific, anna.lake@dentsu.com





Preparing for the Future: Building Climate Resilience for Your Business

16 01 2023

By Ekaterina Hardin and Lia Brussock from NASDAQ • Reposted January 16, 2022

What is Climate Resilience? Climate resilience is the ability to anticipate, prepare for, and withstand hazardous events, shifting consumer trends and behaviors, or business disturbances related to climate change.

Improving climate resilience involves (1) assessing how climate change will create new, or alter current, climate-related risks, and (2) taking steps to better cope with these risks.

Since 2020, the world has seen multiple major events – a global pandemic, a supply chain crisis, a geopolitical conflict and an overall economic volatility. These events have challenged businesses and their ability to remain resilient and to manage a range of external constraints.

  • During the pandemic, labor shortages created clogged marine ports and made companies rely on air freight for logistics and transportation, increasing overall expenses and emissions. Corporates are looking for ways to cut their emissions that spiked during the supply chain crisis.
  • The geopolitical crisis spiked energy and fuel costs. In absence of energy independence, the situation was worsened by the lowered production levels in the Middle East. Then recent diesel shortage added more fuel into the fire.
  • The economic volatility felt by many in the most recent months made businesses look deep into their operations for ways to improve efficiency and cut expenses.

All these challenges are linked to transitional climate risks through fuel, energy and emissions. Setting climate impacts aside, not being able to access resources at low cost also has a direct financial impact. Being able to manage these risks in 2023 and beyond will help companies demonstrate climate resilience and provide access to capital in the long term.

emission graphs

Large Corporates Influence Their Supply Chain to Build Resilience

Climate resilience is crucial for all market participants up and down the value chain. To improve their transitional risk resilience, large corporations who have committed to net zero targets are now engaging with their critical suppliers. Large corporate clients are asking their suppliers to provide their GHG inventories, and in some cases, requiring them to set climate-related targets of their own. In this effort to pass down climate targets, these corporations are working to mitigate their own climate-related risks and improve climate resilience throughout their value chain. According to Nasdaq research, currently 58% of S&P 500 companies have a climate-related goal in their 2022 Proxy Statement. In addition, over 4000 companies of all sizes are taking action to reduce their emissions by setting science-based targets through the Science Based Targets Initiative. Almost half of the 4000+ have already set Science Based targets and almost 1500 companies have made Net Zero commitments (Figure 1A). Scope 3 emission targets (indirect value chain emissions) are a significant portion of these commitments.

Large cap companies are not the only ones committing to science-based emissions reduction targets. Small-to-Medium Enterprises (SMEs) make up almost 20 percent (18.6%) of the total companies listed by SBTi (Figure 1B). A total of 747 SMEs have set targets as of November 2022, in comparison to just 29 two years ago. GHG emissions reduction targets are emerging across market caps and organization types, and in many cases the influence of large corporations on their value chain is clear.

We at Nasdaq ESG Advisory hear about these cascade impacts from our clients: their large corporate customers expect them to measure and to reduce their own Scope 1 and Scope 2 footprints, otherwise they risk losing their shared business. This is a significant challenge that smaller and mid-size companies can anticipate in 2023 and beyond. The tide of climate action is rising, and smaller and mid-size companies now face challenges beyond responding to investor pressures and regulatory requirements. They must also address hindered ability to conduct business with large corporate customers. By not having a climate-related target in place, supply chain participants are exposing themselves to climate-related risks that will directly impact their financial health.

Global Transition to Low Carbon Economy and Geopolitical Crisis

Climate resilience has also been challenged this year by the global energy crisis. The 2022 energy crisis, associated with the geopolitical conflict in Ukraine, made energy costs soar. Consequently, high prices on crude oil and natural gas increased the cost of manufacturing and spiked transportation and distribution costs. Lower production levels in the middle east that followed fuel cost increase in the US, only made the situation worse. Additionally, most recently transition to low carbon economy has been under the microscope due to diesel shortages and associated surging diesel cost.

Back in 2020-2021, when marine transportation industry was clogged because of labor shortages, air freight was the only option to deliver goods to customers. Not only is air freight more carbon intensive, but it is also more costly. As a result, we saw increased emissions and narrower margins. Furthermore, in 2022 businesses that rely on fossil-based fuels for energy to produce and transport their goods saw additionally significant operational expense increases. The geopolitical crisis driving energy cost up, combined with a challenging economic environment emphasized the importance of climate resilience. While trying to stop the short-term value bleed, companies need to think about long-term resilience and build-in mitigation strategies such as self-generated energy and increased share of renewables and alternative fuels, so they can climb out of these challenging times ahead of their peers.

Current Economy and Climate Resilience

It is crucial for executives to set up their businesses for resilience in the long term, especially when markets are very volatile. In 2022, decreasing revenue growth rates and shrinking margins have been a focus for investors. Recession and inflation concerns have curbed investor appetite [Scenario Planning and Explaining Your Resilience – Nasdaq’s Advice on Appealing to Investors in Challenging Times]. To build trust with external stakeholders during these times, it is important for companies to explain their resilience to macro concerns like fuel shortage, energy, and raw materials cost. Additionally, understanding the industry trends and setting differentiators from peers will build confidence in management and will help companies to secure capital needed to navigate through the challenging times. Demonstrating financial resilience and climate risks resilience go hand in hand. Companies that are highly exposed to climate-related financial risks, such as energy cost and security, cost of raw materials, cost of transportation and logistics, can prove their financial resilience by demonstrating how they manage these climate-related risks.

Companies in varying sectors have different climate risk profiles, therefore, the way they demonstrate climate resilience would also be different. We encourage each company to access their business specific short-, mid- and long- term climate-related risks and put resilience strategies in place for those risks that companies cannot afford to tolerate in these downturn conditions. related risks and put resilience strategies in place for those risks that companies cannot afford to tolerate in these downturn conditions.

Understanding Your Business Resilience

In times of economic downturn and high volatility, demonstrating to stakeholders that you are an attractive investment, if revenues are down, is a challenge. Companies need to demonstrate how they are planning to capture future opportunities and curb financial risks in current economic conditions. Climate crisis often acts as a risk multiplier. It multiplies all financial risks – operational risk, credit risk, liquidity, underwriting. Being climate resilient company means being financially resilient company. It means capturing climate-related opportunities and mitigating climate-related financial risks better than your peers and competitors.

Knowing what risks your company is exposed to and how they can impact the financial condition and operations of your business across several time horizons and climate futures, will help executives put appropriate resilience strategies in place and build trust with investors.

Understanding industry risks and company specific resilience starts with understanding your risk exposure, risk vulnerability and your risk tolerance and how those might change in the future. For those risks that you cannot tolerate, management strategies must be put in place. At times when it is hard to justify R&D spend on new technologies, products, or services, optimizing efficiencies to reduce operational costs might be the best way to capture climate opportunities and demonstrate climate resilience. By conducting a peer assessment, understanding industry trends and how to achieve a competitive advantage at lowest cost possible, companies can make a business case for themselves and demonstrate to stakeholders that they are an attractive long-term investment.

The Challenges Nasdaq Sees & How We Can Help

Lack of climate expertise coupled with time and resources constraints are the most common pain points for corporates. Companies that are laser-focused on delivering business outcomes during challenging economic times need high efficiency and low-cost solutions. When time is money and when time needs to be spent on delivering products to the market, conducting labor- and time-intensive tasks such as peer benchmarking and assessment is a challenge for resource constrained companies. Staying on top of all the recent regulatory developments and tracking which direction political winds blow is also very time consuming and disrupting.

Climate risk is a systemic risk – meaning it is a risk you cannot diversify from. However, the way it impacts each industry and company varies. Each company’s path along the climate journey is unique. Businesses operate in different geographies, different sectors, have different supply chains and different stakeholders with different short- and long-term priorities. Nasdaq understands that each company has its own set of considerations, and we prepared to partner at each stage of their journey towards climate and financial resilience. Our goal at Nasdaq is to help our community build resilience and trust. We drive impact through cost-effective resources, tools, and guidance around climate data collection, risk identification, and disclosure, ultimately enabling our community to build competitive differentiation. To start your climate resilience journey, contact Nasdaq ESG Advisory here.

About the Authors

Ekaterina Hardin

Ekaterina Hardin is a Lead ESG Advisor focused on Climate at Nasdaq ESG Advisory Practice within our ESG Solutions Business. Ekaterina was previously with the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB) where she was the Extractives & Mineral Processing Sector Lead Analyst. Ekaterina was also SASB’s climate research lead and Net Zero working group owner. Prior to SASB, Ekaterina was an oil & gas geophysicist for over a decade with an M.S. in Geophysics from University of Moscow, Russia. Later in her career Ekaterina earned an M.S. in Environmental Engineering from UC Irvine, where she focused on Climate Change and Sustainability in the Energy sector.

Lia Brussock

Lia Brussock is a Senior ESG analyst within Nasdaq’s ESG Advisory team. She joins the team with ESG, climate and corporate sustainability expertise. Her prior experience includes environmental footprint management at a global chemical and consumer goods company, where she led engagements with manufacturing facilities to advance progress towards global footprint targets. She is also well-versed in ESG strategy, reporting and benchmarking. Lia holds a M.S. in Sustainability Management from Columbia University and a B.A. in Global Environmental Change & Sustainability with a minor in Economics from Johns Hopkins University.





Is Inflation Eating Into Consumers’ Support Of Purpose-Driven Companies?

16 01 2023

By Anne Field from Forbes.com • Reposted January 16, 2023

Ten years after it was launched, an annual index measuring U.S. consumers’ socially responsible attitudes and behaviors shows mixed progress.

GMG_2022_CCSi2
The Conscious Consumer Spending index resultsGOOD.MUST.GROW

On the one hand, after coming in at a record low of 39 in 2020, the index rose to an all-time high of 51 the next year. In 2022, there was a slight decrease to 48.

On the other, the 2022 result was the second highest since the survey began.

That’s according to the Conscious Consumer Spending Index (CCSIndex), which gauges the extent to which consumers are—or aren’t—embracing conscious consumerism, charitable giving and environmentally-oriented practices.

“After those results in 2021, we expected to see at least a slight decline this year,” says Heath Shackleford, CEO of Good.Must.Grow, a socially responsible marketing consulting firm that administers the research. “But the vast majority of consumers continue to feel purpose is important when they shop.”

The CCSIndex is calculated by assessing such matters as the importance consumers place on buying from socially responsible companies, how they’re supporting those products and services and intent to increase their patronage of such companies. For this year’s research, 1,005 Americans were surveyed. According to Good.Must.Grow, thanks to the design of the index’s design, even a one-point change indicates a meaningful shift in consumer sentiment.

Higher Prices 

Shackleford points to inflation as the main culprit for this year’s decrease. That’s because socially responsible products tend to be more expensive—or at least, are perceived as carrying a higher price tag—than their non-responsible counterparts, he says. Only 57% reported buying goods from socially responsible brands in 2022 compared to 64% in 2021. In 2013, the year of the inaugural index, it was 62%.

Young girl exploring organic body care goods at an open-air market with zero waste concept
Teenager shopping at a summer market. Photo: GETTY

The research shows that, says Shackleford, “A hard core of Americans will support purposeful brands no matter what.” But most of the country, even if they believe such purchases are important, feel they can’t afford to buy them during a time when their purchasing power is down.

At the same time, “A vast majority of consumers feels purpose is important when they shop,” he says. In addition, in 2013, 25% reported boycotting brands that weren’t socially responsible compared to 32% in 2022.

The lesson for companies is: They have to meet consumer expectations for factors like price, in addition to their mission, according to Shackleford.

Other Findings

Additional noteworthy results include:

A growing pessimism among Americans. Respondents indicated a growing sense that the world is getting worse. In 2019, 36% agreed with that statement, increasing to 42% in 2020 and 44% in 2021. In 2022, it was 45%. Also, while those who say the world is getting worse have a lower index score than people who say it’s getting better, the lowest score was for respondents who feel things are pretty much the same.

Decline in charitable giving. The portion of people who made financial contributions to a nonprofits declined by 20% from 2013 to 2022. Those volunteering also decreased.

Votes for the most socially responsible enterprise. For the eighth year, the poll asked respondents for the company or organization they first think of when they think of socially responsible enterprises. The top five: Amazon, Google, the Salvation Army, Apple and Walmart. Amazon, which has topped the list for four years in a row, received twice as many votes as Google in 2022. For the first time, TOMS, an iconic social enterprise, fell off the list. It was the top brand for the first two years of the poll.

To see the original post, follow this link. https://www.forbes.com/sites/annefield/2022/12/18/is-inflation-eating-into-consumers-support-of-purpose-driven-companies/?sh=1d67225a7c7c





How Artificial Intelligence Can Improve Companies’ ESG Work During 2023

16 01 2023

By Leon Kaye from Triple Pundit • Reposted: January 16, 2023

The growth of artificial intelligence (AI) has attracted its fair share of criticism in recent years just as it has become central to the conversation about how to scale up and improve ESG performance across corporate America.

To be fair, such concerns about AI are warranted. After all, humans are still designing these systems, so bias is still a risk at many levels, whether it comes to face recognition technology or how companies vet potential hires. Some brands, in fact, have pledged to work together to prevent algorithmic bias from entering the workplace. Google is an example of a company that says it is striving to teach developers about fairness considerations when building, evaluating and deploying AI and machine learning models.

Nevertheless, AI systems in aggregate can offer the ESG practitioner one important tool that will be hard to overlook: The ability to deal with the overwhelming amount of data through which teams must sift as they gauge their companies’ performance.

Some ways in which AI can prove to be useful, and score that “ah-ha” moment among the skeptics is when it comes to the “E” in ESG — as in measuring and finessing environmental performance. As the World Economic Forum (WEF) reminded us last week, one of the most difficult sets of data to measure are Scope 3 emissions, notoriously pesky to track as they comprise companies’ emissions coming from their supply and value chains. Chasing suppliers down for that data — if they’ll even measure and then reveal such information in the first place — is a task no sane person would demand from another. But reporting systems that run on AI can help solve that problem; WEF points to a BCG study concluding that companies harnessing such technologies are about twice as likely to both measure their emissions effectively and reach their emission reduction targets.

Further, while poorly designed AI systems are at risk of amplifying humans’ biases, at the same time on the “S” for social front, they can help to identify top candidates for jobs while identifying teams of current employees who are at risk of being disengaged. Optimized AI platforms can potentially smooth out potential rough patches between managers and their direct reports. “Managers’ biases can also creep in when it comes to setting goals for employees. AI can help by comparing employees’ goals against others with the same tenure and then alerting managers if they’re consistently assigning fewer or less important goals to certain workers,” wrote technology journalist Linda Rosencrance last year.

Outside a company’s office, AI and machine learning platforms can team up to identify possible snags within a supply chain — a lesson many organizations are still learning after what occurred worldwide during the global pandemic. Supply chain managers can deploy these technologies to help monitor human rights violations such as forced labor or risks including unsafe working conditions.

As for companies with a very specific mission, AI is achieving what used to take huge teams of professionals to accomplish. Take the plant-based protein industry, which on one hand can harness this technology to determine what raw materials can recreate the texture and nutrition of meat at a competitive cost — while on the other AI-driven sequencing can even improve their flavors, too.

Finally, at a time when more investors adopt an ESG framework to hone in on companies’ governance structures, AI can also lend an assist. Companies with operations spread all over the globe need to know in real time how regulations differ in different companies and here in the U.S., even in different states. Next-generation risk modeling can help corporate boards make decisions with the best possible information as they evaluate market trends and potential risks. “As for governance, a focus on data sovereignty and the creation of a single view of real-time data ensures that data is treated with respect,” Mike Hughes wrote for Forbes last month. 

To see the original post, follow this link. https://www.triplepundit.com/story/2023/artificial-intelligence-esg-2023/763941





4 tips from a CSR expert on how to make the most impact in 2023

16 01 2023

Effective ESG practices provide companies with an opportunity to demonstrate their commitment to environmental sustainability, community and equity by integrating these tenets into everyday business processes and company culture.

By Jess Welser  –  Director of B:CIVIC and CSR, Denver Metro Chamber Leadership Foundation • Reposted: January 16, 2023

As I look back on the stories shared in this year’s Good Works Colorado content hub, I’m thrilled to see how our state’s leaders have enthusiastically implemented environmental, social and governance policies (ESG) and invested in corporate social responsibility (CSR) efforts. 

ESG and CSR are constantly evolving. ESG is a framework for measuring and managing risks and opportunities around a company’s commitment to environmental, social and corporate governance. CSR is a reflection of what a company believes, expressed by how it impacts its stakeholders internally and externally. We like to think of it as how a company aligns its social and environmental activities with its business purpose and values. Or elevating business for good. More and more, ESG and CSR are recognized as an essential component of a smart, viable business strategy for Colorado companies. 

This was one of our founding goals at B:CIVIC, an affiliate of the Denver Metro Chamber Leadership Foundation. Alongside business and community leaders, B:CIVIC is increasing the amount of impact and collective good for the Colorado community. After eight years of doing this work, there are a few lessons we want to share with business leaders who are on their ESG and CSR journey.

1. Now’s the time for ESG. 

As our community faces unprecedented social, economic and environmental challenges, local corporations are taking ownership of their impact through ESG. Effective ESG practices provide companies with an opportunity to demonstrate their commitment to environmental sustainability, community and equity by integrating these tenets into everyday business processes and company culture. 

As ESG practices advance in Colorado and across the globe, it’s important that business leaders continue to develop and enhance their ESG strategy. Like the ever-changing world around us, these strategies must remain nimble to meet the moment — whatever that moment has in store. 

2. It pays to invest in CSR. 

As we head into what may be a recession, many companies are preparing for economic downturn by downsizing budgets, instituting travel freezes and more. Though the immediate future remains uncertain, we know CSR programs and personnel are an important investment for a company’s long-term success. 

To ensure continued engagement, we are encouraging CSR leaders to double down. The economic downturn will impact industries differently, but we can anticipate that employee giving and engagement will experience a decline. Further, economic hardship causes increased stress among employees. To encourage connection, focus on promoting skills-based volunteering and employee well-being programs that boost morale and build community. As we continue through these uncertain times, we challenge CSR leaders to get creative with their CSR strategies. It pays to invest in the community and your people, especially in times of economic hardship. 

3. Colorado is a good place to do business. 

Did you know Colorado is one of the best places to do business? In a 2022 CNBC ranking, Colorado came in at No. 4 in America’s Top States for Business list. The state also ranked No. 12 in the category of life, health and inclusion. These rankings are in large part due to the social impact commitments of our business community — commitments that are continuing to grow alongside our economy. 

The secret’s out: People, organizations and businesses are making the move to Colorado to join in on the great benefits this state has to offer. As the business community grows, the resources available for CSR and ESG will grow with it. The future is full of possibilities for CSR and ESG impact.

4. Create the infrastructure today to meet the challenges of tomorrow. 

When business leaders invest in a company’s CSR infrastructure today, they are better prepared to speak out and advocate for the issues that matter to their community and stakeholders. In a recent report released by the Edelman Trust Barometer — a metric that studies trust in business, government, NGOs and the media — it was found that employees care about how their leadership demonstrates commitment to the community. 

According to the Trust Barometer, when considering a job, 60% of employees stated that they want their CEO to speak out on controversial issues they care about. Eighty percent of the general population want CEOs to be personally visible when discussing public policy with external stakeholders or work their company has done to benefit society. Further, 60% of people surveyed will choose a place to work based on their beliefs and values. 

It’s clear the workforce wants business leaders to stand up for the issues that matter to them. Implementing ESG and CSR practices is a great way to demonstrate your company’s commitment to the community. 

As your team is planning for next year, we hope that you consider the above guidance to maximize the impact of your CSR and ESG practices. Want to keep the conversation going? Reach out to our team at B:CIVIC. Together, we can increase the impact and collective good of the community.

To see the original post of this article, follow this link. https://www.bizjournals.com/denver/news/2022/12/23/4-tips-from-csr-expert-on-how-to-make-an-impact.html





Newsweek publishes its list of America’s Most Responsible Companies for 2023

15 01 2023

America’s Most Responsible Companies 2023

In recent years, and especially with the rise in popularity of “ESG” (environment, social and corporate governance) focused investing, “corporate responsibility” has become a phrase many companies are happy to use in their advertising. There is no set definition but generally it is used as shorthand for “Our company is not a soulless machine designed to do absolutely anything–no matter how destructive, reckless or dishonest–in pursuit of a buck.” In any given case, it can be hard to tell whether such a statement means a corporation really tries to treat its customers, employees and planet decently or is just public relations blather. Talking the talk is easy, but walking the walk is hard.

To highlight those corporations that are actually serious about trying to be good guys, Newsweek has partnered with global research and data firm Statista for our fourth annual list of America’s Most Responsible Companies. This year our list includes 500 of the U.S’s largest public corporations. They vary dramatically by size and by industry. We found the largest number of responsible companies (55) in the materials and chemicals business; the fewest (12) in hotels, dining and leisure. Our overall number one this year is the computer hardware giant HP.

We are proud to present this year’s ranking and to honor companies that actually mean it when they say they are serious about being good corporate citizens.

RankCompanyHQ StateIndustry RankIndustryOverall ScoreEnvironmental ScoreSocial ScoreCorporate Governance Score
1HPCalifornia1Technology Hardware93.0994.9499.5184.93
2General MillsMinnesota1Consumer Goods91.7992.0686.8496.56
3Whirlpool CorporationMichigan2Consumer Goods91.5393.8385.2195.64
4Merck & CoNew Jersey1Health Care & Life Sciences89.9591.07100.0078.86
5CloroxCalifornia3Consumer Goods89.5694.6888.0886.03
6HNIIowa4Consumer Goods89.4096.2187.9284.15
7Applied MaterialsCalifornia2Technology Hardware89.1291.0289.6486.80
8IntelCalifornia3Technology Hardware88.9888.3092.5186.21
9S&P GlobalNew York1Financial88.8095.2371.27100.00
10TapestryNew York5Consumer Goods88.6991.6087.4287.14
11XylemDistrict of Columbia1Capital Goods88.6895.0277.2193.90
12Abbott LaboratoriesIllinois2Health Care & Life Sciences88.0389.8480.9293.40
13QualcommCalifornia4Technology Hardware87.7283.3583.7996.10
14Keysight TechnologiesCalifornia1Software & Telecommunications87.6889.8679.2194.08
15AptargroupIllinois1Materials & Chemicals87.6896.7888.2478.13
16Texas InstrumentsTexas5Technology Hardware87.3984.5795.1582.53
17MicrosoftWashington2Software & Telecommunications86.9798.7669.1193.14
18Estee Lauder CompaniesNew York6Consumer Goods86.6192.8581.3885.69
19Cisco SystemsCalifornia6Technology Hardware86.5599.5174.5585.70
20Advanced Micro DevicesCalifornia7Technology Hardware86.5293.9775.3790.30
21BroadcomCalifornia8Technology Hardware86.2981.9282.4294.61
22AvientOhio2Materials & Chemicals86.2791.0978.5389.28
23Sensata TechnologiesMassachusetts9Technology Hardware86.0386.7878.1793.23
24Owens CorningOhio3Materials & Chemicals85.8082.4179.8995.19
25CortevaIndiana4Materials & Chemicals85.7981.4080.3895.69
26NVIDIACalifornia10Technology Hardware85.6986.9484.0886.13
27IlluminaCalifornia3Health Care & Life Sciences85.5490.5893.3772.75
28Campbell SoupNew Jersey7Consumer Goods85.2591.9078.6085.34
29Boston PropertiesMassachusetts1Real Estate & Housing85.2399.3878.1378.29
30Analog DevicesMassachusetts11Technology Hardware85.0995.5972.4587.34
31LumentumCalifornia3Software & Telecommunications85.0393.0876.4785.63
32JacobsTexas1Professional Services84.9895.2179.3280.50
33Maxim Integrated ProductsCalifornia12Technology Hardware84.9591.5780.1883.20
34Hewlett Packard EnterpriseTexas13Technology Hardware84.8095.3083.1576.04
35CumminsIndiana1Automotive & Components84.6392.1478.1683.68
36Lear CorporationMichigan2Automotive & Components84.6291.8170.8091.34
37Edgewell Personal CareConnecticut8Consumer Goods84.5789.8977.3486.57
38PayPal HoldingsCalifornia2Financial84.3593.7569.9789.42
39Walt DisneyCalifornia1Hotels, Dining & Leisure84.2793.5776.4082.94
40MastercardNew York3Financial84.2096.2765.9090.52
41ComericaTexas4Financial84.0990.7583.0178.59
42TrinseoPennsylvania5Materials & Chemicals84.0491.9977.8782.34
43United RentalsConnecticut2Professional Services83.7492.0981.6477.60
44Iron MountainMassachusetts4Software & Telecommunications83.7293.3572.5285.39
45Regeneron PharmaceuticalsNew York4Health Care & Life Sciences83.5685.0887.6977.98
46EcolabMinnesota6Materials & Chemicals83.5596.3884.5069.88
47Berry GlobalIndiana7Materials & Chemicals83.5190.2974.1286.20
48Sun CommunitiesMichigan2Real Estate & Housing83.4890.3674.0886.09
49Newmont GoldColorado8Materials & Chemicals83.4066.2194.6789.39
50Eversource EnergyMassachusetts1Energy & Utilities83.3094.1582.1973.66
51Vertex PharmaceuticalsMassachusetts5Health Care & Life Sciences83.2674.6191.8483.40
52SeagenWashington6Health Care & Life Sciences83.1884.0783.0682.48
53American TowerMassachusetts5Software & Telecommunications83.1287.1581.7480.56
54Lam ResearchCalifornia14Technology Hardware82.9992.9887.8868.22
55Granite ConstructionCalifornia2Capital Goods82.9883.9777.9187.15
56General MotorsMichigan3Automotive & Components82.9491.3468.2889.29
57CraneConnecticut9Materials & Chemicals82.7984.8177.9285.72
58IngevitySouth Carolina10Materials & Chemicals82.6372.5188.2187.23
59ZoetisNew Jersey7Health Care & Life Sciences82.6085.4177.7584.72
60Baxter InternationalIllinois8Health Care & Life Sciences82.5992.1780.8074.90
61Moody’sNew York5Financial82.5484.4471.1692.10
62Edwards LifesciencesCalifornia9Health Care & Life Sciences82.4986.8771.6389.05
63Lowe’s CompaniesNorth Carolina1Retail82.4091.2775.8880.12
64Public Service Enterprise GroupNew Jersey2Energy & Utilities82.3380.8381.8984.35
65Kimberly-ClarkTexas9Consumer Goods82.3079.5176.1491.33
66JabilFlorida15Technology Hardware82.1183.5273.9188.96
67Regency CentersFlorida3Real Estate & Housing82.0288.7677.3280.09
68Motorola SolutionsIllinois16Technology Hardware81.9990.4471.8883.74
69Keurig Dr PepperMassachusetts10Consumer Goods81.9888.0874.8683.09
70Dell TechnologiesTexas17Technology Hardware81.9392.2876.1377.47
71AGCOGeorgia3Capital Goods81.9275.6281.9988.23
72Las Vegas SandsNevada2Hotels, Dining & Leisure81.7687.3780.5277.47
73Waste ManagementTexas3Energy & Utilities81.6382.3684.3078.31
74Jones Lang LaSalleIllinois4Real Estate & Housing81.6384.2672.3188.39
75Western DigitalCalifornia18Technology Hardware81.5883.5683.1878.08
76Armstrong World IndustriesPennsylvania4Capital Goods81.4884.0278.0782.42
77RibbonTexas6Software & Telecommunications81.3982.5077.3184.44
78KrogerOhio2Retail81.3488.1571.7684.19
79Principal Financial GroupIowa6Financial81.2183.4873.9486.29
80CaleresMissouri11Consumer Goods81.1481.3281.9880.19
81McCormick & CompanyMaryland12Consumer Goods81.0693.5983.2666.42
82Summit MaterialsColorado11Materials & Chemicals80.9883.8972.8786.26
83Kimball InternationalIndiana13Consumer Goods80.8989.7279.0574.01
84AdobeCalifornia7Software & Telecommunications80.8788.8171.9981.89
85AmphenolConnecticut19Technology Hardware80.8489.6773.7079.25
86Huntington BancsharesOhio7Financial80.8284.5079.2678.80
87Cadence Design SystemsCalifornia8Software & Telecommunications80.7963.7989.2289.41
88PPLPennsylvania4Energy & Utilities80.7868.5799.2874.55
89Ball CorpColorado12Materials & Chemicals80.6986.8479.9575.38
90EXL ServicesNew York3Professional Services80.6777.7272.0392.33
91Healthpeak PropertiesColorado5Real Estate & Housing80.5490.2874.8476.59
92Sherwin-WilliamsOhio13Materials & Chemicals80.4987.9970.0683.50
93Univar SolutionsIllinois14Materials & Chemicals80.4792.8262.6586.02
94American WaterNew Jersey5Energy & Utilities80.4374.2291.9475.22
95HasbroRhode Island14Consumer Goods80.4189.3785.2266.72
96AppleCalifornia20Technology Hardware80.2491.3763.0086.45
97TargetMinnesota3Retail80.1890.2170.3080.10
98Newell BrandsGeorgia15Consumer Goods80.0081.8872.4485.75
99DeereIllinois5Capital Goods80.0087.9387.4364.71
100ManpowerGroupWisconsin4Professional Services79.9393.0972.2774.53
101Agilent TechnologiesCalifornia10Health Care & Life Sciences79.9394.5264.9280.45
102Baker HughesTexas6Energy & Utilities79.8991.9077.3470.53
103American ExpressNew York8Financial79.8793.4664.7181.55
104PNC Financial ServicesPennsylvania9Financial79.8183.3278.9877.22
105Hudson Pacific PropertiesCalifornia6Real Estate & Housing79.7084.2175.6579.33
106First SolarArizona7Energy & Utilities79.6789.7873.5875.74
107Eastman ChemicalTennessee15Materials & Chemicals79.6668.3486.2484.48
108Mettler-Toledo InternationalOhio21Technology Hardware79.6188.1964.8185.91
109NielsenNew York5Professional Services79.5983.7174.1680.98
110HessNew York8Energy & Utilities79.5977.8881.7379.24
111Colgate-PalmoliveNew York16Consumer Goods79.5580.5474.8783.31
112CenterPoint EnergyTexas9Energy & Utilities79.5471.0192.3775.31
113CBRE GroupTexas7Real Estate & Housing79.5272.9977.7187.94
114PPG IndustriesPennsylvania16Materials & Chemicals79.4782.4077.5878.53
115Becton Dickinson andNew Jersey11Health Care & Life Sciences79.4688.5168.8681.09
116Carter’sGeorgia17Consumer Goods79.4188.6974.6774.98
117Verizon CommunicationsNew York9Software & Telecommunications79.3988.2073.2776.79
118UbiquitiNew York10Software & Telecommunications79.1683.5564.8389.18
119BorgWarnerMichigan4Automotive & Components79.0779.1178.4979.67
120PotlatchDelticWashington6Capital Goods79.0578.8472.5185.88
121M&T BankNew York10Financial79.0183.6570.1883.28
122W W GraingerIllinois7Capital Goods78.9576.6775.7484.51
123AutodeskCalifornia11Software & Telecommunications78.9484.1384.9667.82
124IBMNew York12Software & Telecommunications78.8780.9676.7878.93
125Howmet AerospacePennsylvania8Capital Goods78.8580.6369.0286.99
126Deckers OutdoorCalifornia18Consumer Goods78.8369.7382.8284.02
127California Water Service GroupCalifornia10Energy & Utilities78.7770.1489.8476.40
128Regal RexnordWisconsin9Capital Goods78.6793.1167.7375.26
129NasdaqNew York11Financial78.6776.0163.9996.08
130Micron TechnologyIdaho22Technology Hardware78.6480.3678.3077.34
131Zurn Elkay Water SolutionsWisconsin10Capital Goods78.5680.9676.5878.22
132Thermo Fisher ScientificMassachusetts12Health Care & Life Sciences78.5477.0372.5586.11
133CommScope Holding CompanyNorth Carolina23Technology Hardware78.4794.4267.5473.55
134Kraft HeinzIllinois19Consumer Goods78.4581.0870.6483.71
135FMCPennsylvania17Materials & Chemicals78.3885.0167.1283.09
136Tennant CompanyMinnesota11Capital Goods78.3767.7487.1180.34
137CSXFlorida1Transport & Logistics78.2684.6469.5880.65
138CelaneseTexas18Materials & Chemicals78.2669.3497.3568.16
139AZZTexas12Capital Goods78.2083.2765.9785.43
140IDEXX LaboratoriesMaine13Health Care & Life Sciences78.1975.7882.6276.26
141GapCalifornia4Retail78.1977.4367.9989.22
142Williams CompaniesOklahoma11Energy & Utilities78.1766.1492.0376.41
143Emerson ElectricMissouri13Capital Goods78.1385.1172.7676.61
144Church & DwightNew Jersey20Consumer Goods78.0793.4472.0368.82
145Marriott InternationalMaryland3Hotels, Dining & Leisure78.0679.5581.8272.88
146SempraCalifornia12Energy & Utilities78.0565.6388.5680.02
147InvescoGeorgia12Financial78.0391.1365.3277.73
148ValvolineKentucky5Automotive & Components77.9278.8972.4182.54
149Ingersoll RandNorth Carolina14Capital Goods77.8881.9666.9384.83
150UnitedHealth GroupMinnesota14Health Care & Life Sciences77.8891.8671.4470.43
151ViasatCalifornia13Software & Telecommunications77.8487.0373.7772.83
152The Home DepotGeorgia5Retail77.8078.6276.6378.25
153Host Hotels & ResortsMaryland4Hotels, Dining & Leisure77.7890.0668.7874.60
154Norfolk SouthernGeorgia2Transport & Logistics77.7782.8270.7979.77
155RepligenMassachusetts15Health Care & Life Sciences77.7676.5566.7190.08
156VisteonMichigan6Automotive & Components77.7492.0473.4267.87
157Yum! BrandsKentucky5Hotels, Dining & Leisure77.7191.5862.7778.88
158Lennox InternationalTexas15Capital Goods77.7189.8474.6668.70
159ServiceNowCalifornia14Software & Telecommunications77.6878.0168.5286.58
160Commercial Metals CompanyTexas19Materials & Chemicals77.6882.8070.4579.86
161Conagra BrandsIllinois21Consumer Goods77.6390.1369.8173.03
162WatersMassachusetts16Health Care & Life Sciences77.6392.6567.2673.06
163JPMorgan Chase & CoNew York13Financial77.6084.0163.4985.37
164AbbVieIllinois17Health Care & Life Sciences77.5584.3970.8377.52
165MetLifeNew York14Financial77.4881.3467.3283.87
166West Pharmaceutical ServicesPennsylvania18Health Care & Life Sciences77.4479.2469.2283.95
167California ResourcesCalifornia13Energy & Utilities77.2873.0283.6975.20
168DanaherDistrict of Columbia19Health Care & Life Sciences77.2269.8677.6584.23
169FedExTennessee3Transport & Logistics77.2173.6875.9582.08
170NordsonOhio16Capital Goods77.1570.8083.4177.30
171Bank of AmericaNorth Carolina15Financial77.1490.2969.7371.50
172USANA Health SciencesUtah22Consumer Goods77.0274.0575.4481.65
173LabcorpNorth Carolina20Health Care & Life Sciences76.9684.1170.4876.40
174TeradataCalifornia15Software & Telecommunications76.9578.6861.3190.94
175Best BuyMinnesota6Retail76.8892.5272.7665.45
176KennametalPennsylvania17Capital Goods76.8886.1673.5371.02
177Stanley Black & DeckerConnecticut18Capital Goods76.8792.6664.9073.14
178AlcoaPennsylvania20Materials & Chemicals76.8061.4381.7187.33
179KoppersPennsylvania20Materials & Chemicals76.8079.1880.9070.41
180United TherapeuticsMaryland21Health Care & Life Sciences76.7961.4583.9485.03
181PfizerNew York22Health Care & Life Sciences76.7673.3569.7887.21
182MascoMichigan19Capital Goods76.6975.3669.0985.71
183Kimco RealtyNew York8Real Estate & Housing76.6786.4085.3258.37
184Qurate Retail GroupPennsylvania7Retail76.5688.5571.5369.68
185OtisConnecticut20Capital Goods76.5075.2872.0382.26
186Organon & Co.New Jersey23Health Care & Life Sciences76.4376.6284.3168.44
187Reliance Worldwide CorporationGeorgia21Capital Goods76.3867.2675.2486.71
188Air Products and ChemicalsPennsylvania22Materials & Chemicals76.3778.0176.9974.18
189Fluor CorporationTexas22Capital Goods76.3380.7070.0378.34
190SPXNorth Carolina23Capital Goods76.3178.1471.9378.94
191Darling IngredientsTexas23Consumer Goods76.2971.3668.3489.25
192Insulet CorporationMassachusetts24Health Care & Life Sciences76.2479.8077.5771.45
193Essex Property TrustCalifornia9Real Estate & Housing76.1688.5471.3868.65
194Truist FinancialNorth Carolina16Financial76.1168.7882.0477.59
195AtkoreIllinois24Capital Goods76.1175.2667.0686.09
196Pioneer Natural ResourcesTexas14Energy & Utilities76.0982.8079.1966.36
197VMwareCalifornia16Software & Telecommunications75.99100.0045.9282.14
198Regions FinancialAlabama17Financial75.9773.1977.6677.14
199WorkdayCalifornia17Software & Telecommunications75.9778.8867.5281.59
200SnapCalifornia18Software & Telecommunications75.9271.2884.7771.77
201PVHNew York8Retail75.9088.6066.9772.21
202Fifth Third BankOhio18Financial75.8993.1970.2564.33
203InfineraCalifornia24Technology Hardware75.8981.9468.9976.82
204Kilroy RealtyCalifornia10Real Estate & Housing75.8788.9263.4275.36
205Watts Water TechnologiesMassachusetts25Capital Goods75.8380.2466.1581.17
206XeroxConnecticut25Technology Hardware75.8096.3862.4868.63
207PrudentialNew Jersey19Financial75.7881.0965.5580.79
208Digital Realty TrustTexas11Real Estate & Housing75.7780.9278.3968.09
209OnsemiArizona26Technology Hardware75.6885.9956.0785.06
210BizLinkCalifornia26Technology Hardware75.6880.8273.6572.64
211Brixmor Property GroupNew York12Real Estate & Housing75.6573.2787.6166.15
212APA CorpTexas15Energy & Utilities75.5964.6174.6387.61
213Tractor Supply Co.Tennessee9Retail75.5080.3677.1769.07
214Dover CorporationIllinois26Capital Goods75.4773.5368.8184.14
215Universal DisplayNew Jersey28Technology Hardware75.4474.9980.4770.93
216United Parcel ServiceGeorgia4Transport & Logistics75.4375.2074.2676.91
217DanaOhio7Automotive & Components75.4283.1170.3872.86
218MicrochipArizona29Technology Hardware75.4281.4764.4380.44
219Teledyne TechnologiesCalifornia30Technology Hardware75.4180.2369.8976.18
220Element SolutionsFlorida23Materials & Chemicals75.4086.7466.4673.09
221GXOConnecticut5Transport & Logistics75.3276.8379.6269.60
222Fortune BrandsIllinois24Consumer Goods75.2980.4671.9573.53
223Weatherford InternationalTexas16Energy & Utilities75.2570.3578.9876.48
224Federal Realty Investment TrustMaryland13Real Estate & Housing75.2186.3264.4174.97
225J M SmuckerOhio25Consumer Goods75.2086.3563.5275.81
226GlobalFoundriesNew York31Technology Hardware75.1688.6966.3570.52
227AT&TTexas19Software & Telecommunications75.1480.1672.3672.97
228General ElectricMassachusetts27Capital Goods75.1077.6370.3777.37
229HubbellConnecticut28Capital Goods75.0577.6369.0978.51
230VF CorporationColorado26Consumer Goods75.0584.5869.7670.88
231AvalonBay CommunitiesVirginia14Real Estate & Housing74.8392.1467.1165.32
232Vornado Realty TrustNew York15Real Estate & Housing74.7990.4362.6971.34
233Crown HoldingsPennsylvania24Materials & Chemicals74.7774.3063.9286.16
234VirtusaMassachusetts20Software & Telecommunications74.6789.4864.0370.59
235CintasOhio27Consumer Goods74.6075.7168.6479.53
236State StreetMassachusetts20Financial74.5988.5853.6481.63
237Public StorageCalifornia16Real Estate & Housing74.5186.4770.0167.14
238GreifOhio25Materials & Chemicals74.4487.0258.1678.23
239Pacific Premier BancorpCalifornia21Financial74.3783.9369.6469.63
240Helmerich & PayneOklahoma17Energy & Utilities74.3667.6873.1382.34
241Salesforce.ComCalifornia21Software & Telecommunications74.2778.9671.6672.28
242LPL FinancialCalifornia22Financial74.2681.8669.4571.54
243Comfort Systems USATexas29Capital Goods74.2277.0668.9976.69
244Realty IncomeCalifornia17Real Estate & Housing74.2070.2089.5862.89
245National Energy Services ReunitedTexas18Energy & Utilities74.1979.0066.0877.58
246AlbemarleNorth Carolina26Materials & Chemicals74.1970.5883.9368.13
247Crown CastleTexas22Software & Telecommunications74.1571.8972.7077.93
248Arista NetworksCalifornia23Software & Telecommunications74.0576.5065.1080.64
249Quaker HoughtonPennsylvania27Materials & Chemicals74.0375.3460.0586.78
250ADMIllinois28Consumer Goods73.9780.6072.9668.45
251BungeMissouri29Consumer Goods73.9188.1567.9065.76
252UnumTennessee23Financial73.9071.2371.5079.04
253SBAFlorida24Software & Telecommunications73.8767.9566.8286.92
254Hormel FoodsMinnesota30Consumer Goods73.8779.3283.4558.93
255VentasIllinois18Real Estate & Housing73.8171.8170.4579.24
256SpireMissouri19Energy & Utilities73.7964.7785.2471.43
257TimkenOhio30Capital Goods73.7780.5271.7069.18
258Bank of New York MellonNew York24Financial73.7687.9265.3868.07
259Omnicom GroupNew York6Professional Services73.7471.8971.3378.07
260ItronWashington7Professional Services73.7380.4068.4372.44
261Phibro Animal HealthNew Jersey25Health Care & Life Sciences73.7271.0669.6280.55
262Constellation Energy CorporationMaryland20Energy & Utilities73.7064.2985.6671.20
263Juniper NetworksCalifornia32Technology Hardware73.6767.2974.1679.62
264Cirrus LogicTexas33Technology Hardware73.6463.0473.1784.78
265Adtalem Global EducationIllinois8Professional Services73.6377.2271.7771.99
266TeradyneMassachusetts34Technology Hardware73.6079.6349.8891.39
267ABM IndustriesNew York9Professional Services73.6056.9877.1186.77
268CoupaCalifornia25Software & Telecommunications73.5673.9065.7181.15
269Allison TransmissionIndiana31Capital Goods73.5180.6664.3275.63
270MacerichCalifornia19Real Estate & Housing73.5090.0356.9173.64
271Illinois Tool WorksIllinois32Capital Goods73.4482.9468.8368.64
272Kosmos EnergyTexas21Energy & Utilities73.4270.5580.3569.43
273TPI CompositesArizona33Capital Goods73.4273.5382.3564.43
274Knowles CorporationIllinois35Technology Hardware73.4087.2468.2964.75
275TJX CompaniesMassachusetts10Retail73.3773.7766.6679.75
276Avanos MedicalGeorgia26Health Care & Life Sciences73.3676.4873.2370.45
277AMETEKPennsylvania36Technology Hardware73.2686.1570.6663.07
278Tanger Factory Outlet CentersNorth Carolina20Real Estate & Housing73.2583.3574.9861.52
279Cooper-Standard HoldingsMichigan8Automotive & Components73.1190.4672.4156.55
280NiSourceIndiana22Energy & Utilities73.0871.7076.5471.06
281American Axle & Manufacturing HoldingsMichigan9Automotive & Components73.0478.0465.5275.64
282HalliburtonTexas23Energy & Utilities73.0374.0671.4973.63
283Helen of TroyTexas31Consumer Goods73.0079.4579.5360.11
284NetAppCalifornia26Software & Telecommunications72.9667.8260.0091.13
285ResMedCalifornia27Health Care & Life Sciences72.9374.9067.8876.08
286Alliant EnergyWisconsin24Energy & Utilities72.9369.0886.6563.12
287Hilton Worldwide HoldingsVirginia6Hotels, Dining & Leisure72.9275.4267.5775.85
288CatalentNew Jersey28Health Care & Life Sciences72.9281.3068.6368.90
289WestrockGeorgia28Materials & Chemicals72.9064.8270.8183.14
290CarrierFlorida34Capital Goods72.8780.9272.6465.13
291Expeditors International of WashingtonWashington6Transport & Logistics72.8480.8076.3261.48
292GenArizona27Software & Telecommunications72.8061.3167.4189.73
293Mueller Water ProductsGeorgia35Capital Goods72.7974.3470.8073.31
294CaterpillarIllinois36Capital Goods72.7276.5862.0679.62
295Green PlainsNebraska29Materials & Chemicals72.7161.1875.0781.94
296XPO LogisticsConnecticut7Transport & Logistics72.7067.6672.5877.94
297Equity ResidentialIllinois21Real Estate & Housing72.6684.7065.6467.73
298AramarkPennsylvania7Hotels, Dining & Leisure72.6274.9968.8774.06
299Alphabet (Google)California28Software & Telecommunications72.5388.9359.5069.25
300PetcoCalifornia11Retail72.5084.1659.5773.83
301Ormat TechnologiesNevada25Energy & Utilities72.4970.3171.2875.96
302MattelCalifornia32Consumer Goods72.4480.9270.7965.71
303Hecla MiningIdaho30Materials & Chemicals72.3977.5158.8980.84
304FactSetConnecticut25Financial72.3751.5373.5892.06
305Simpson Manufacturing CompanyCalifornia37Capital Goods72.3668.7477.9370.49
306Compass Minerals InternationalKansas31Materials & Chemicals72.3263.9873.7279.33
307Charles River LaboratoriesMassachusetts29Health Care & Life Sciences72.3177.8374.3264.86
308Graphic PackagingGeorgia32Materials & Chemicals72.3069.0072.9974.98
309GrafTech InternationalOhio38Capital Goods72.2670.2871.3475.22
310KeyCorpOhio26Financial72.2579.8559.8777.10
311OshkoshWisconsin10Automotive & Components72.2083.5370.9362.21
312Kansas City SouthernMissouri8Transport & Logistics72.1158.9979.0978.29
313IPGNew York10Professional Services72.1074.3160.2081.88
314HubSpotMassachusetts29Software & Telecommunications72.0979.3851.3685.62
315Goodyear Tire & Rubber CoOhio11Automotive & Components72.0679.6970.6565.93
316Kelly ServicesMichigan11Professional Services72.0270.5775.1170.46
317SimsNew York33Materials & Chemicals71.9781.0564.9969.95
318BalchemNew York34Materials & Chemicals71.9358.1568.0289.68
319CotyNew York33Consumer Goods71.9083.4272.7559.62
320KratonTexas35Materials & Chemicals71.9071.6470.9873.15
321DXC TechnologyVirginia12Professional Services71.8677.4565.6872.54
322Worthington IndustriesOhio36Materials & Chemicals71.8387.7054.7373.14
323SanminaCalifornia37Technology Hardware71.7779.0754.6081.73
324Scotts Miracle-GroOhio37Materials & Chemicals71.7677.4169.0068.94
325NOVTexas26Energy & Utilities71.7569.2375.8570.23
326Columbus McKinnonNew York39Capital Goods71.6990.9464.4559.76
327U.S. SilicaTexas38Materials & Chemicals71.5673.6580.8960.23
328SynopsysCalifornia30Software & Telecommunications71.5169.4463.5281.63
329AECOMTexas13Professional Services71.4655.0880.0879.28
330UnifiNorth Carolina39Materials & Chemicals71.4573.5064.8876.06
331FortiveWashington40Capital Goods71.4256.8962.7694.67
332Schlumberger NVTexas27Energy & Utilities71.4284.8871.9357.52
333Masonite InternationalFlorida41Capital Goods71.4077.2967.4469.54
334HologicMassachusetts30Health Care & Life Sciences71.3870.3058.1185.80
335Pactiv EvergreenIllinois40Materials & Chemicals71.3672.1170.5271.53
336ICFVirginia14Professional Services71.2284.3973.1056.25
337HanesbrandsNorth Carolina34Consumer Goods71.1585.8364.2263.47
338Empire State Reality TrustNew York22Real Estate & Housing71.1280.4452.8180.20
339Union PacificNebraska9Transport & Logistics71.1083.6955.9673.75
340Williams-SonomaCalifornia35Consumer Goods71.0663.2870.1679.80
341National InstrumentsTexas31Software & Telecommunications71.0477.7867.1768.26
342KLA CorporationCalifornia38Technology Hardware71.0440.0677.7295.39
343GartnerConnecticut15Professional Services71.0258.9667.9186.23
344Mid-America Apartment CommunitiesTennessee23Real Estate & Housing71.0085.7553.1574.19
345SteelcaseMichigan36Consumer Goods70.9987.8962.9462.22
346Molson Coors BrewingIllinois37Consumer Goods70.9683.2866.6763.00
347C.H. RobinsonMinnesota10Transport & Logistics70.8964.1975.6572.90
348AkamaiMassachusetts32Software & Telecommunications70.8877.9350.3984.42
349IntuitiveCalifornia31Health Care & Life Sciences70.8862.6377.8572.21
350Packaging Corporation of AmericaIllinois41Materials & Chemicals70.8563.8565.4783.28
351Ralph LaurenNew York38Consumer Goods70.8592.1149.9770.55
352ZendeskCalifornia33Software & Telecommunications70.7365.3467.8779.04
353Silicon LabsTexas39Technology Hardware70.6688.8970.4152.78
354SL Green RealtyNew York24Real Estate & Housing70.6578.4054.9478.70
355Dick’s Sporting GoodsPennsylvania12Retail70.6471.5162.0178.47
356MSA SafetyPennsylvania16Professional Services70.5083.2967.3360.97
357Global PaymentsGeorgia27Financial70.4884.1558.5168.87
358Murphy USAArkansas13Retail70.4463.6471.9975.76
359EntergyLouisiana28Energy & Utilities70.3844.9998.1568.05
360Essential UtilitiesPennsylvania29Energy & Utilities70.3780.1873.4057.61
361Howard HughesTexas25Real Estate & Housing70.2874.9562.1073.86
362Palo Alto NetworksCalifornia34Software & Telecommunications70.2377.1267.2466.41
363ONEOKOklahoma30Energy & Utilities70.2363.8073.1373.83
364Dominion EnergyVirginia31Energy & Utilities70.2150.7387.5672.38
365BrunswickIllinois42Capital Goods70.1865.2564.7780.60
366CF Industries HoldingsIllinois42Materials & Chemicals70.1745.3973.1292.05
367Marsh McLennanNew York17Professional Services70.1157.7364.8387.81
368Bread FinancialOhio28Financial70.0769.0667.2174.01
369Merit Medical SystemsUtah32Health Care & Life Sciences70.0762.3472.2875.64
370PerkinElmerMassachusetts33Health Care & Life Sciences70.0562.7565.4082.08
371Sonoco ProductsSouth Carolina43Materials & Chemicals70.0585.3860.1264.73
372GoDaddyArizona35Software & Telecommunications70.0471.3853.7785.03
373Ziff DavisNew York36Software & Telecommunications70.0254.4768.7386.90
374GenthermMichigan12Automotive & Components70.0177.0562.8670.19
375FormFactorCalifornia40Technology Hardware69.9579.3250.3680.26
376The Cheesecake FactoryCalifornia8Hotels, Dining & Leisure69.9383.3349.5676.98
377Skywork SolutionsCalifornia41Technology Hardware69.9271.8969.8868.06
378AmedisysLouisiana34Health Care & Life Sciences69.8967.7575.1566.82
379Booz Allen HamiltonVirginia18Professional Services69.8756.4771.2981.91
380Polaris Inc.Minnesota13Automotive & Components69.8481.8366.5961.19
381UDRColorado26Real Estate & Housing69.8481.7060.6467.26
382TextronRhode Island43Capital Goods69.8180.6164.9963.92
383Brown-FormanKentucky39Consumer Goods69.8164.3957.9787.12
384KB HomeCalifornia27Real Estate & Housing69.7757.1975.4076.77
385Sensient TechnologiesWisconsin44Materials & Chemicals69.7468.5562.2778.46
386Winnebago IndustriesIowa14Automotive & Components69.6861.4457.2490.41
387BurlingtonNew Jersey14Retail69.6191.2860.2457.40
388Dentsply SironaNorth Carolina35Health Care & Life Sciences69.6081.1476.7151.02
389TimkenSteelOhio45Materials & Chemicals69.5568.2965.2575.20
390SunPowerCalifornia32Energy & Utilities69.5170.8779.4458.30
391DiscoverIllinois29Financial69.4469.6866.2372.47
392Meritage HomesArizona28Real Estate & Housing69.4247.7165.0695.55
393EnerSysPennsylvania42Technology Hardware69.4077.9848.7781.53
394Harley-DavidsonWisconsin15Automotive & Components69.3478.1165.6864.31
395TerexConnecticut44Capital Goods69.3167.0876.0564.87
396Cabot MicroelectronicsIllinois43Technology Hardware69.3084.1169.3554.52
397Clearway EnergyNew Jersey33Energy & Utilities69.2878.6468.7860.48
398DTE EnergyMichigan34Energy & Utilities69.1556.6079.6771.23
399Franklin ElectricIndiana44Technology Hardware69.1374.7869.1963.49
400Corporate Office Properties TrustMaryland29Real Estate & Housing69.0277.0368.9161.19
401ManitowocWisconsin45Capital Goods68.9963.3271.2872.42
402MPLX LPOhio35Energy & Utilities68.9861.1965.1180.69
403H&R BlockMissouri19Professional Services68.9768.0668.1270.80
404Xcel EnergyMinnesota36Energy & Utilities68.9253.4978.7574.58
405Ameriprise FinancialMinnesota30Financial68.9162.6852.9491.19
406AMN Healthcare ServicesTexas36Health Care & Life Sciences68.8966.5768.7671.40
407T. Rowe PriceMaryland31Financial68.8970.4367.5368.78
408T-MobileWashington37Software & Telecommunications68.8392.8549.8763.88
409Lumen TechnologiesLouisiana38Software & Telecommunications68.7774.7466.6165.04
410Renewable Energy GroupIowa37Energy & Utilities68.7682.8078.4145.16
411Iridium CommunicationsVirginia39Software & Telecommunications68.7481.0251.4673.82
412BlackbaudSouth Carolina40Software & Telecommunications68.6279.1352.7474.06
413Sunstone Hotel InvestorsCalifornia30Real Estate & Housing68.5575.4964.4365.81
414Gates Industrial CorporationColorado46Capital Goods68.5269.1775.1461.34
415Thor IndustriesIndiana16Automotive & Components68.4672.1859.2074.07
416International Flavors & FragrancesNew York46Materials & Chemicals68.4474.9265.5264.94
417PrologisCalifornia31Real Estate & Housing68.4069.6468.5867.06
418EquinixCalifornia41Software & Telecommunications68.3963.8266.8674.55
419Vistra EnergyTexas38Energy & Utilities68.3857.1580.4567.60
420CrestwoodTexas39Energy & Utilities68.3259.9883.3261.72
421AlnylamMassachusetts37Health Care & Life Sciences68.3276.4169.0659.56
422CeridianMinnesota42Software & Telecommunications68.2978.1463.8362.97
423LittelfuseIllinois45Technology Hardware68.2578.9469.8956.00
424Brinker InternationalTexas9Hotels, Dining & Leisure68.2479.2956.0769.43
425Hersha Hospitality TrustPennsylvania32Real Estate & Housing68.1385.6756.0062.82
426AARIllinois11Transport & Logistics68.1269.4850.9983.97
427Nextera EnergyFlorida40Energy & Utilities68.1256.4883.8964.05
428Tyler TechnologiesTexas43Software & Telecommunications68.0679.9661.0663.23
429NorthWestern EnergySouth Dakota41Energy & Utilities68.0452.9480.9970.26
430Roper TechnologiesFlorida46Technology Hardware68.0158.0065.8680.22
431Lincoln NationalPennsylvania32Financial68.0087.9367.0949.08
432Automatic Data ProcessingNew Jersey44Software & Telecommunications67.9960.5661.0282.44
433Taylor MorrisonArizona33Real Estate & Housing67.9832.6480.9490.39
434IPG PhotonicsNew York47Technology Hardware67.9859.5366.0678.40
435Western MidstreamTexas42Energy & Utilities67.9653.4465.6984.82
436Hawaiian Electric IndustriesHawaii43Energy & Utilities67.8653.0882.3768.19
437WESCO InternationalPennsylvania12Transport & Logistics67.8572.4870.4060.73
438DolbyCalifornia45Software & Telecommunications67.8452.0070.0781.50
439Southwest AirlinesTexas13Transport & Logistics67.7366.8361.8774.56
440CallawayCalifornia40Consumer Goods67.7260.1968.0674.96
441Alamo GroupTexas14Transport & Logistics67.7078.1860.7564.24
442Cooper TiresOhio17Automotive & Components67.6972.6964.0866.37
443KadantMassachusetts48Technology Hardware67.6869.8752.9180.33
444WolfspeedNorth Carolina48Technology Hardware67.6881.2265.2856.61
445EnphaseCalifornia50Technology Hardware67.6762.9572.2367.90
446CohuCalifornia51Technology Hardware67.6465.3662.1275.52
447Sprouts Farmers MarketArizona15Retail67.6368.2662.3972.32
448Monolithic Power SystemsWashington52Technology Hardware67.6162.2665.6075.04
449FISFlorida46Software & Telecommunications67.5070.3852.6479.55
450Sleep NumberMinnesota16Retail67.5070.3760.6671.53
451Synchrony FinancialConnecticut33Financial67.4459.8277.3965.17
452Paramount GlobalNew York10Hotels, Dining & Leisure67.3964.3068.4469.48
453Henry ScheinNew York38Health Care & Life Sciences67.3565.0661.0676.00
454eHealthCalifornia34Financial67.3469.5570.9461.60
455LiventPennsylvania47Materials & Chemicals67.2773.7766.6761.45
456Carlisle CompaniesArizona48Materials & Chemicals67.1666.9453.4681.15
457Cooper CompaniesCalifornia39Health Care & Life Sciences67.1650.5872.9677.98
458VeecoNew York53Technology Hardware67.1586.5244.8870.13
459O-IOhio49Materials & Chemicals67.1149.8077.2974.29
460Sealed AirNorth Carolina50Materials & Chemicals67.0768.6460.1972.44
461Cornerstone Building BrandsNorth Carolina47Capital Goods67.0675.4965.0060.79
462Pebblebrook Hotel TrustMaryland11Hotels, Dining & Leisure67.0679.5763.7157.99
463GibraltarNew York48Capital Goods67.0566.8474.2260.18
464Varex ImagingUtah40Health Care & Life Sciences66.9969.4466.6464.95
465NRG EnergyTexas44Energy & Utilities66.9549.3072.1679.44
466FiservWisconsin47Software & Telecommunications66.8957.6066.2776.88
467HawkinsMinnesota51Materials & Chemicals66.7464.9661.3074.03
468Rogers CorporationArizona52Materials & Chemicals66.7173.9864.0062.22
469HF SinclaorTexas45Energy & Utilities66.6476.6574.4248.93
470MDU ResourcesNorth Dakota45Energy & Utilities66.6444.7584.9870.23
471National VisionGeorgia17Retail66.5955.1959.0585.60
472TransUnionIllinois20Professional Services66.5883.0254.3762.45
473Paramount GroupNew York34Real Estate & Housing66.5268.0054.8976.73
474Citrix SystemsFlorida48Software & Telecommunications66.4359.4351.1388.79
475ANSYSPennsylvania48Software & Telecommunications66.4369.5962.4567.31
476IntuitCalifornia50Software & Telecommunications66.4071.1659.2468.87
477SwitchNevada54Technology Hardware66.3664.5966.9667.59
478VeritivGeorgia53Materials & Chemicals66.2549.4673.4075.95
479HarscoPennsylvania21Professional Services66.2360.2174.3264.22
480Cabot CorporationMassachusetts54Materials & Chemicals66.2165.1971.1162.39
481The HanoverMassachusetts35Financial66.1968.5657.9972.09
482Americold Realty TrustGeorgia35Real Estate & Housing66.1875.8271.6751.13
483CentennialColorado47Energy & Utilities66.1750.3371.0177.23
484American Homes 4 RentCalifornia36Real Estate & Housing66.1260.8074.1163.49
485Equitrans MidstreamPennsylvania48Energy & Utilities66.1156.5579.7362.11
486Avis Budget GroupNew Jersey22Professional Services66.0962.7165.9069.73
487The Container StoreTexas18Retail66.0677.3550.8570.06
488Advanced Drainage SystemsOhio49Energy & Utilities66.0668.0863.5466.64
489QTSKansas37Real Estate & Housing66.0662.2269.3366.69
490Devon EnergyOklahoma50Energy & Utilities65.9365.3867.5664.92
491Installed Building ProductsOhio23Professional Services65.9251.8769.2176.73
492WabtecPennsylvania15Transport & Logistics65.9260.0368.9468.84
493Caesars EntertainmentNevada12Hotels, Dining & Leisure65.8983.1651.2763.31
494Array TechnologiesNew Mexico51Energy & Utilities65.8869.1360.8567.73
495New Jersey ResourcesNew Jersey52Energy & Utilities65.7756.2966.1674.92
496Range ResourcesTexas53Energy & Utilities65.7657.8876.6862.78
497Hostess BrandsKansas41Consumer Goods65.6858.0368.5770.52
498Kontoor BrandsNorth Carolina42Consumer Goods65.6154.3360.6681.90
499Greenbrier CompaniesOregon16Transport & Logistics65.6064.8867.5764.42

  Visit our rankings portal 

Licensing

If your company was listed in the ranking, click here to learn more about the licensing options.METHODOLOGY

THE RANKING AMERICA’S MOST RESPONSIBLE Companies 2023 focuses on a holistic view of corporate responsibility that considers all three pillars of ESG: environment, social and corporate governance. 
In total, 500 companies were identified as America’s Most Responsible Companies.The initial analysis focused on the top 2000 public companies by revenue and banks and insurance companies with total assets exceeding $50 billion. 

The analysis is based on two metrics:
1. Quantitative data from KPI (key performance indicator) research: More than 30 KPIs from the three areas of CSR (corporate social responsibility) were considered for the ranking.
2. The CSR reputation of each company from an extensive survey of 13,000 U.S. residents: Respondents were asked to select companies familiar to them and then to evaluate the company’s CSR performance in general and in the three sub-dimensions: social, environmental and governance.

  Visit our rankings portal 

he selection of the companies and the definition of the evaluation criteria were carried out according to independent journalistic criteria of Newsweek and Statista. The evaluation was carried out by the statistics and market research company Statista. Newsweek and Statista make no claim to the completeness of the companies examined.
The ranking is composed exclusively of U.S. companies that are eligible regarding the criteria described here. A position in the ranking is a positive recognition based on research of publicly available data sources at the time, the information provided in the validation survey and an extensive survey of U.S. residents. The ranking is the result of an elaborate process which, due to the interval of data-collection and analysis, is a reflection of official ESG data from 2020 or 2021. Furthermore, events following November 3, 2022 were not a subject of this survey. As such, the results of this ranking should not be used as the sole source of information for future deliberations. The information provided in this ranking should be considered in conjunction with other available information. The quality of companies that are not included in the ranking is not disputed. For a complete methodology see newsweek.com/amrc-2023 

ewsweek and Statista make no claim to the completeness of the companies examined.
The ranking is composed exclusively of U.S. companies that are eligible regarding the criteria described here. A position in the ranking is a positive recognition based on research of publicly available data sources at the time, the information provided in the validation survey and an extensive survey of U.S. residents. The ranking is the result of an elaborate process which, due to the interval of data-collection and analysis, is a reflection of official ESG data from 2020 or 2021. Furthermore, events following November 3, 2022 were not a subject of this survey. As such, the results of this ranking should not be used as the sole source of information for future deliberations. The information provided in this ranking should be considered in conjunction with other available information. The quality of companies that are not included in the ranking is not disputed. For a complete methodology see newsweek.com/amrc-2023 





Green jobs are booming, but too few employees have sustainability skills to fill them – here are 4 ways to close the gap

15 01 2023

U.S. universities now have over 3,000 sustainability programs. Photo: Andy DeLisle/ASU

By Christopher Boone, Professor of Sustainability, Arizona State University and Karen C. Seto, Professor of Geography and Urbanization Science, Yale University from The Conversation. Re-posted: January 15, 2022

To meet today’s global sustainability challenges, the corporate world needs more than a few chief sustainability officers – it needs an army of employees, in all areas of business, thinking about sustainability in their decisions every day.

That means product designers, supply managers, economists, scientists, architects and many others with the knowledge to both recognize unsustainable practices and find ways to improve sustainability for the overall health of their companies and the planet.

Employers are increasingly looking for those skills. We analyzed job ads from a global database and found a tenfold increase in the number of jobs with “sustainability” in the title over the last decade, reaching 177,000 in 2021.

What’s troubling is that there are not enough skilled workers to meet the rapid growth in green and sustainability jobs available.

While the number of “green jobs” grew globally at a rate of 8% per year over the last five years, the number of people listing green skills in their profiles only grew by 6% per year, according to a LinkedIn analysis of its nearly 800 million users.

A man stands beside a 3-D printer in a university lab.
When employees are trained to think about sustainable materials and processes, they can improve corporate innovation and the bottom line. Photo: Sona Srinarayana/ASU

As professors who train future workers in sustainability principles and techniques, we see several effective ways for people at all stages of their careers to gain those skills and increase those numbers.

Where sustainability jobs are growing fastest

In the U.S., jobs in the renewable energy and environment sectorsgrew by 237%over the last five years. Globally, the transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy is forecast to result in a net increase in jobs for the energy sector. 

But green jobs go well beyond solar panel installation and wind turbine maintenance. 

Sustainable fashion is one of the fastest-growing green jobs sectors, averaging a 90% growth rate annually between 2016 and 2020. 

The rapid expansion of ESG investing – environment, social and governance – and portfolio management is opening up new jobs in sustainable finance. In 2021, the accounting firm PwC announced that it would invest US$12 billion and create 100,000 new jobs in ESG investing by 2026. 

There is also a growing demand for urban sustainability officers who can help transition cities to be net-zero carbon and more resilient. After all, the world is adding 1 million people to cities every five days and building 20,000 American football fields’ worth of urban areas someplace on the planet every day. 

In 2013, when the Rockefeller Foundation launched 100 Resilient Cities, a network to help cities become more sustainable, few cities had a resilience or sustainability officer. Today, more than 250 communities and 1,000 local government professionals are part of the Urban Sustainability Directors Network

The number of companies with chief sustainability officers in executive positions also tripled from 9% to 28% between 2016 and 2021. But given the scale and business opportunities of sustainability, these skills are needed much more widely within organizations.

So, where can you find training?

Most sustainability and green jobs require creative problem-solving, synthesizing and technical skills. Some of those skills can be learned on the job, but boosting the number of qualified job applicants will require more effective and accessible training opportunities that target employers’ needs. Here are a some training sources to consider.

University programs: Sustainability is increasingly being incorporated into a wide range of university programs. Fifteen years ago, sustainability training was mostly ad hoc – a product designer or economist might have taken a class in sustainability approaches from the environmental science department. Today, U.S. universities have about 3,000 programs with a “sustainability” label, up from 13 in 2008.

A National Academies report recommends looking for a competency-based approach to sustainability learning that blends content with skills and links knowledge to action to solve problems and develop solutions.

Micro-credentials: For mid-career employees who don’t have the time to reinvest in full-fledged degrees, short courses and micro-credentials offered by universities, colleges or professional groups offer one way to develop sustainability skills.

A micro-credential might involve taking a series of courses or workshops focused on a specific skill, such as in wind energy technology or how to incorporate ESG criteria into business operations.

A group of people wearing hard hats install a large window.
U.S. architect Michael Reynolds holds four-week, hands-on training sessions, primarily for architects, in sustainable design principles, construction methods and philosophy. Participation can count toward Western Colorado University’s Master in Environmental Management graduate degree. Photo: Pablo Porciuncula/AFP via Getty Images

Short courses and micro credentials take up less time and are much less expensive than college degree programs. That may also help lower-income individuals train for sustainability jobs and diversify the field.

Specializations: A similar option is jobs-focused online certificate programs with a sustainability specialization. 

For example, Google teamed up with universities to provide online courses for project managers, and Arizona State University is offering a sustainability specialization to accompany it. Project management is an area where the U.S. Department of Labor expects to see fast job growth, with 100,000 job openings in the next decade.

A pile of boxes of various sizes ready for shipping at a FedEx shipping distribution center.
Sustainable packaging design that reduces costs and reuses materials is an area ripe for innovation in many companies as consumer shipping increases.Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Corporate training: Some companies have developed their own internal sustainability training in climate sciencesustainable financesustainability reporting and other skills.

Integrating sustainability across all functions of companies will require some level of sustainability training and understanding for most if not all employees. Companies like StarbucksHSBCSalesforce and Microsoft have created internal training programs to spread sustainability knowledge and practice throughout their companies, not just for employees who have sustainability in their titles.

Closing the gap

A recent survey by Microsoft and BCG of major companies found that only 43% of sustainability professionals in businesses had sustainability-related degrees, and 68% of sustainability leaders were hired internally. 

It’s clear that on-the-job sustainability training and up-skilling will be necessary to fill the growing number of roles inside of companies.

To meet the sustainability skills gap, we believe more training will be required – at colleges and universities, by professional organizations and from employers. Achieving global sustainability and meeting climate change challenges will become more likely as legions of people commit their working hours to sustainability solutions.

To see the original post, follow this link: https://theconversation.com/green-jobs-are-booming-but-too-few-employees-have-sustainability-skills-to-fill-them-here-are-4-ways-to-close-the-gap-193953





3 reasons local climate activism is more powerful than people realize

15 01 2023

Photo: CNN

By Adam Aron, Professor of Psychology, University of California, San Diego from The Conversation • Re-posted: January 15, 2023

Global warming has increased the number of extreme weather events around the world by 400% since the 1980s. Countries know how to stop the damage from worsening: stop burning fossil fuels and shift to renewable energy, electrify transportation and industry, and reduce the carbon intensity of agriculture.

But none of this is happening fast enough to avoid warming on a catastrophic scale.

In my new book, “The Climate Crisis,” I lay out the mechanisms and impacts of the climate crisis and the reasons behind the lack of serious effort to combat it. One powerful reason is the influence that the fossil fuel industry, electric utilities and others with a vested interest in fossil fuels have over policymakers. 

But there’s another reason for this inaction that everyone has the ability to change: response skepticism – the public doesn’t believe in its own political power enough or use it.

When people speak up and work together, they can spur powerful changes. You can see this in university students demanding that their chancellor retire the campus fossil fuel power plant and switch to renewable electricity. You can also see it in ranchers in Colorado pushing their governor to enact a clean electricity standard so that they can benefit from having wind turbines on their lands. 

A female student sits on a yoga ball in a hallway reading a book. Other students are on laptops behind her.
MIT students study while staging a sit-in outside the university chancellor’s office in 2016 calling for the university to divest from fossil fuels. Photo by Jonathan Wiggs/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Yet, while 70% of American adults describe climate change as an important concern, only 10% say they volunteered for an activity focused on addressing climate change or contacted an elected official about it in the previous year, according to a 2021 Pew Research Center poll.

Why do so few adults participate in actions to encourage governments and decision-makers to do more about climate change, even though surveys show they support doing so, and how can they overcome the skepticism holding them back?

What prevents people from speaking out

Polls show some people see how money from wealthy industries and individuals influences politicians and don’t believe politicians listen to the public.

Others are distracted by arguments that can tamp down engagement, such as campaigns that urge people to focus on individual recycling, or ask why the U.S. should do more if other countries aren’t, or argue that that there’s no need to rush because future technology will save humanity. Some believe that corporate and university promises to reach carbon neutrality in the future – often far in the future – are enough.

These narratives can be seductive. The focus on recycling, for example, offers a sense of satisfaction that one accomplished something. The arguments that China emits more greenhouse gases and that future technology will fix everything appear to exonerate people from having to take any steps now.

https://datawrapper.dwcdn.net/4bEdb/1/

Studies have found that participating in local climate actions may require a constellation of values, attitudes and beliefs, including believing in one’s own ability, and the group’s, to get things done. Some of these beliefs can be developed through practice in organizing together, which is often downright fun, and has other psychological benefits that flow from increased solidarity in an often alienating society.

What I believe is particularly important is having a local theory of change – believing that, while human-caused climate change is a global problem, it is worthwhile taking local action.

3 reasons local activism matters

Research and history suggest that local action is more powerful than many people realize. Here are three key reasons:

First, much of the policy change that can affect climate change is local rather than national.

For example, replacing fossil fuel power plants with renewable energy technology can help lower greenhouse gas emissions. Much of this is under the control of state governments, which delegate the authority to public utility commissions. The public can pay attention to what utilities and public utility commissions do, and let their governors know that they are watching by writing letters and joining local groups that make their voices heard.

A man in a plaid shirt sits at a desk with a microphone, his hands folded as in prayer. He stares intently at whomever is speaking outside the image.
South Dakota landowners whose property is crossed by the Keystone XL pipeline attended public utilities commission hearings in 2015 to make their opposition known. AP Photo/James Nord

Cities can set policies to replace natural gas with electric appliances in homes and buildings, encourage homeowners to install efficient electric heat pumps and determine whether investments are made in public transit instead of freeways. When pressured, city officials do enact these policies.

Second, local wins can become contagious. In 1997, a handful of advocates in Massachusetts won their battle for a local policy under which a portion of electricity bill payments went to a not-for-profit agency that funneled money toward renewables. By 2022, this policy, known as community choice aggregation, was adopted by over 1,800 local governments across six states, affecting millions of people. Local action can also create learning curves for technology – pushing for more solar and wind turbines leads to increased manufacture and price drops.

Third, local action can trigger national policy, spread to other countries and ultimately trigger global agreements.

There are many historical examples, from the suffragette movement that won U.S. women the right to vote, to the fight for a 40-hour work week. Local action in the Southern U.S. catalyzed 1960s civil rights lawsLocal action for same-sex marriage, starting in San Francisco, led to state laws and ultimately to federal legislation signed in December 2022 that prohibits states from refusing to recognize out-of-state marriages based on sex, race or ethnicity.

An historical photo of several women in fancy hats holding signs advertising a meeting about the right to vote.
Suffragettes succeeded in winning the right of women to vote by working together and speaking out. Bettmann via Getty Images

Environmental regulation in the 1970s is a striking case. It started with public alarm about cities clouded in smog, rivers catching fire from industrial waste and beaches fouled by oil spills. Citizens organized thousands of protest actions, and municipalities responded by implementing environmental enforcement. 

The lawsuits that followed were very costly for corporate interests, which then supported federal intervention as a way to have predictable rules. It was President Richard Nixon who signed some of the furthest reaching legislation ever.

Youth successes in changing climate policy

In 2022, Congress passed the Inflation Reduction Act, which authorizes nearly $400 billion of climate-related spending over 10 years. I believe the youth-led Sunrise Movement can claim a major role in its success. 

The group has relentlessly organized marches and demonstrations in dozens of cities since 2019 and pressured Democrats in Congress. While the result fell short of the group’s vision for a Green New Deal, it went further than any previous climate-related law.

Group action targeted at local decision-makers is a time-honored tradition – and I believe necessary in the current political environment for action on climate change.





Cone: 76% of Millennials would take a pay cut to for work for a responsible company.

3 11 2016

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Three-quarters (76%) of Millennials consider a company’s social and environmental commitments when deciding where to work and nearly two-thirds (64%) won’t take a job if a potential employer doesn’t have strong corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices, according to the 2016 Cone Communications Millennial Employee Engagement Study.

The study reveals that meaningful engagement around CSR is a business – and bottom line – imperative, impacting a company’s ability to appeal to, retain and inspire Millennial talent. More than any other generation, Millennials see a company’s commitment to responsible business practices as a key factor to their employment decisions:

  • 75% say they would take a pay cut to work for a responsible company (vs. 55% U.S. average)
  • 83% would be more loyal to a company that helps them contribute to social and environmental issues (vs. 70% U.S. average)
  • 88% say their job is more ful lling when they are provided opportunities to make a positive impact on social and environmental issues (vs. 74% U.S. average)
  • 76% consider a company’s social and environmental commitments when deciding where to work (vs. 58% U.S. average)
  • 64% won’t take a job from a company that doesn’t have strong CSR practices (vs. 51% U.S. average)“Millennials will soon make up 50 percent of the workforce and companies will have to radically evolve their value proposition to attract and retain this socially conscious group,” says Alison DaSilva, executive vice president, CSR Research & Insights, Cone Communications. “Integrating a deeper sense of purpose and responsibility into the work experience will have a clear bottom line return for companies.”

Cone will allow you to download the report here if you register.

http://www.conecomm.com/research-blog/2016-millennial-employee-engagement-study





DiCaprio’s Before The Flood is an epic documentary on Climate Change

2 11 2016

before-the-flood-cover

Leonardo DiCaprio spent two years traveling the globe to talk to those on the front line of Climate Change and focus on the key sources and impacts of the problems.  In the process, he talks to scientists, sustainability and carbon reduction experts, local government officials and world leaders including U.S. President Barack Obama and U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon.

According to The Los Angeles Times:  “The origins of wanting to do this movie is to give the scientific community out there a voice,” DiCaprio said before the screening, to more cheers in the packed house, at Toronto’s giant and august Princess of Wales Theater. “Because we have ignored the predictions of the scientific community for way too long.”

You can watch the entire film on You Tube here.

 

https://www.beforetheflood.com





Cause Marketing Halo Awards: Social Impact To Build A Better World And Bottom Line

17 02 2016

halo_dog_square_with_logo_smaller

 

The 2016 Cause Marketing Halo Awards announced its 42 finalists of programs designed to yield both social and financial dividends.  The Gold and Service winners in each of ten categories will be announced at the at the 2016 Cause Marketing Forum Annual Conference in Chicago June 1-2, 2016.

 

CMF_logo_larger

 

More than 100 entries were received in the Cause Marketing Forum’s competition for North American programs designed to yield social and financial dividends.

Programs named finalists in multiple categories include

  • Bank of America’s “Pass the Flame” campaign with Special Olympics promoting inclusion of people with intellectual disabilities in sports and in life;
  • Think it Up’ Staples/DonorsChoose.org partnership supporting student-powered, teacher-led projects in classrooms across the country;
  • Gateways and Getaways’, a bird- and flight-centric education program for New York families from JetBlue and the Wildlife Conservation Society;
  • Dementia-Friendly Massachusetts’ which Senior Living Residences developed to help people better understand the challenges of living with dementia;
  • #Unlimited’ a tween-targeted back to school program from Old Navy and Boys & Girls Clubs of America to support summer programming for kids.

The Halo Awards will highlight many of the most innovative programs that companies and causes took at the intersection of profit and purpose last year. Some examples include:

  • A video game marathon that raised funds to put veterans back to work.
  • An app that helps autistic children make social and emotional connections.
  • Canvas shoes turned into artwork to support high school arts programs.
  • “Thumb Socks” that help persuade teens from texting and

With the proliferation of cause campaigns reaching consumers each day, the Cause Marketing Halo Awards are designed to bring clarity, innovation and best practices to light.

About the Cause Marketing Forum

Now in their fourteenth year, the Cause Marketing Halo Awards are North America’s highest honor in the field of cause marketing. They are presented to US and Canadian companies by the Cause Marketing Forum, a company dedicated to providing business and nonprofit executives with the practical information and connections they need to succeed.

All Halo finalists can be seen online at: http://www.CauseMarketingForum.com/halo2016

original post  http://www.csrwire.com/press_releases/38699-These-Corporate-Social-Impact-Programs-Build-a-Better-World-and-the-Bottom-Line





New Survey: Only 10% of Americans trust business to behave ethically.

17 09 2015

96 percent of Americans believe it is important for companies to ensure their employees behave ethically but only 10 percent have trust and confidence in major companies to do what is right.

2015_1

Pharmaceuticals and health insurance were viewed to be the least trustworthy industries. The most trustworthy were thought to be manufacturing, technology and large retailing.

Princeton Survey Research Associates International’s 2015 Public Affairs Pulse survey polled 1,600 Americans on their attitudes about corporate behavior, big business and small business, the trustworthiness of companies and industries, levels of regulation, and lobbying and politics. The study found the vast majority of the public expects the business sector to think beyond profits and be valuable components of society.

Other interesting findings include:

  • More than nine in 10 Americans say businesses need to protect the environment, including 76 percent who feel it is very important that businesses limit their environmental damage.
  • 88 percent believe companies should contribute to charities
  • 85 percent believe they should take a leadership role in helping society in ways that go beyond their business operations
  • 39 percent believe it is very important that businesses take more responsibility in helping the government solve problems.

How can companies communicate what they’re doing for these causes? Social media is reportedly the best way that companies can communicate what they are doing for social causes, with 45 percent calling it very effective and 38 percent calling it somewhat effective. Not surprisingly, those under 50 years old were more strongly in favor of social media communication than those over 50.

Only 15 percent say social media has a significant influence on their opinions, while almost 40 percent say it does not influence their opinion at all. Personal experiences as a customer or employee of a major company were the top factors influencing people’s opinions of a business.

Access more of the Princeton Survey here.  http://pac.org/pulse/

 





TetraPak: Most U.S. Consumers Would Choose Renewable Packaging to Help Mitigate Climate Change

17 08 2015

Tetra_1

 

A new survey suggests U.S. consumers are largely unaware of the severity of global resource scarcity, but their choice of packaging would be impacted if they had readily available information on how renewable materials mitigate climate change.

Tetra Pak and the Global Footprint Network conducted a survey of 1,000 U.S. consumers about their grocery spending habits. An overwhelming 86 percent agreed that if they knew the use of renewable packaging contributed to reducing carbon emissions, it would impact their choice of packaging. Women were particularly motivated to choose renewable packaging options based on this knowledge: 90 percent of females said they would modify their purchasing habits while 77 percent of men did.

According to TetraPak, consumers indicated that they are ready to be held as accountable as government and industry for climate change, and they are ready to support actions to mitigate its harmful effects. While 81 percent of respondents said that no one group is responsible for addressing natural resource constraints, the majority also believes that no single group is doing enough.

“Our survey confirms our belief that with information and education, consumers will respond favorably to the need to pay closer attention to resource challenges and change their individual actions, including making more environmentally responsible decisions around packaging,” said Elizabeth Comere, Director of Environment & Government Affairs for Tetra Pak US and Canada.

The survey also asked respondents about specific actions they would be willing to take to conserve natural resources. The top three responses were:

  • buying local grown food as much as possible (75 percent)
  • only buying as much food as a household was going to consume (72 percent)
  • seeking out food or beverage products that come in renewable packaging (69 percent).

Daily purchasing choices can make a difference, said Mathis Wackernagel, president and co-founder of Global Footprint Network.

“How we meet our basic needs — including food — is a powerful way to shape sustainability. Eating food from local sources and less emphasis on animal-based diets can lower the Ecological Footprint,” he said. “When we buy packaged foods, opting for packaging made from renewable materials also contributes to a lower Ecological Footprint.”

These findings coincide with Earth Overshoot Day, an indicator of when humanity has used up nature’s ‘budget’ for the entire year. Global Footprint Network announced Wednesdaythat we have overshot faster than ever: Overshoot Day moved from early October in 2000 to August 13th this year.

This survey follows Tetra Pak’s launch of the first carton made entirely from renewable packaging materials last year, and is the latest evidence that consumers desire more sustainable packaging options.

 

Original article from Sustainable Brands





Most Americans Support Government Action on Climate Change.

30 01 2015

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The poll found that 83% of Americans, including 61% of Republicans and 86% of independents, say that if nothing is done to reduce emissions, global warming will be a very or somewhat serious problem in the future.

An overwhelming majority of the American public, including nearly half of Republicans, support government action to curb global warming, according to a poll conducted by The New York Times,Stanford University and the nonpartisan environmental research group Resources for the Future.

Among Republicans, 48 percent said they are more likely to vote for a candidate who supports fighting climate change, a result that Jon A. Krosnick, a professor of political science at Stanford University and an author of the survey, called “the most powerful finding” in the poll. Many Republican candidates either question the science of climate change or do not publicly address the issue.

Although the poll found that climate change was not a top issue in determining a person’s vote, a candidate’s position on climate change influences how a person will vote. For example, 67 percent of respondents, including 48 percent of Republicans and 72 percent of independents, said they were less likely to vote for a candidate who said that human-caused climate change is a hoax.

Over all, the number of Americans who believe that climate change is caused by human activity is growing. In a 2011 Stanford University poll, 72 percent of people thought climate change was caused at least in part by human activities. That grew to 81 percent in the latest poll. By party, 88 percent of Democrats, 83 percent of independents and 71 percent of Republicans said that climate change was caused at least in part by human activities.

Although the poll found that climate change was not a top issue in determining a person’s vote, a candidate’s position on climate change influences how a person will vote. For example, 67 percent of respondents, including 48 percent of Republicans and 72 percent of independents, said they were less likely to vote for a candidate who said that human-caused climate change is a hoax.

Jason Becker, a self-identified independent and stay-at-home father in Ocoee, Fla., said that although climate change was not his top concern, a candidate who questioned global warming would seem out of touch.

“If someone feels it’s a hoax they are denying the evidence out there. Many arguments can be made on both sides of the fence. But to just ignore it completely indicates a close-minded individual, and I don’t want a close-minded individual in a seat of political power.”

Source:  The New York Times.





Tetra Pak introduces milk cartons made entirely from plant based materials.

20 01 2015

Finnish dairy producer, Valio, has become the first company in the world to sell products to consumers in Tetra Pak’s carton packaging made entirely from plant-based materials.

Valio is piloting the Tetra Rex Bio-based packaging until mid-March.

Valio is piloting the Tetra Rex Bio-based packaging for its lactose free semi-skimmed milk drink in retail outlets across Finland until mid-March, and will then use feedback from consumers to decide whether to adopt the cartons more broadly across its chilled product range. Charles Brand, executive vice president of product management & commercial operations for Tetra Pak said: “To finally see fully renewable packages on shop shelves is a fantastic feeling … and bears testimony to the focused efforts of the many customers, suppliers and Tetra Pak employees involved in making this a reality. We have been gradually increasing the use of renewable  materials in our packages over the years and that work will continue, as we look for ways to extend the fully-renewable concept to other parts of our portfolio without compromising safety, quality or functionality.”

TetraPak.

The cartons are manufactured from a combination of plastics derived from plants and paperboard. It is claimed to be a world first and, says Tetra Pak, is a milestone in its commitment to drive ever-stronger environmental performance across all parts of its portfolio and operations. The low density polyethylene used to create the laminate film for the packaging material and the neck of the opening, together with the high density polyethylene used for the cap, are all derived from sugar cane. These plastics, like the Forest Stewardship Council (FSCTM) certified paperboard, are traceable to their origins. The Tetra Rex fully renewable package can be identified by the words “Bio-based” printed on the gable of the package.

 

Elli Siltala, marketing director at Valio said: “Valio is committed to increasing the share of renewable resources in its packaging material. We share a common vision of innovation and environmental responsibility with Tetra Pak and we are proud to be the first in the world to make our products available in a fully renewable carton package.” The milk drink will be available in one-litre capacity Tetra Rex Bio-based packages, with a cap made of sugarcane and will use Tetra Pak filling machine.

Post originally appeared on 2 degrees network.

https://www.2degreesnetwork.com/groups/2degrees-community/resources/tetra-paks-fully-renewable-carton-package-hits-shelves/utm_campaign=Editors_Highlights_NL&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=15654923&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-8PkxfQxlCfb3ugb0XJDkrTJsHeYALw88d_X7-oyEXihYmtLCrrdfcBKGy1bO1fLBeVmwJXbMIVMKqyk6zIWM3vW-62nQ&_hsmi=15654923





Timberland Tires: A Brand With An End Game in Mind

4 11 2014

Timberland’s partnership with Omni United will create co-branded automotive tires specifically designed to be recycled into footwear outsoles when their road journey is complete.

 

 

Timberland Tires

According to a joint press announcement, Timberland and Omni United first conceived this partnership three years ago, when sustainability leaders from both brands came together to address a longstanding shared concern. The tire and footwear industries are two of the largest users of virgin rubber. The majority of tires on the market today have a limited life span; ecologically-sound disposal at the end of that life span presents yet another challenge.

In a statement, Stewart Whitney, president of Timberland said,  “Our partnership with Omni United marks a new day for the tire and footwear industries.  An outdoor lifestyle brand and an automotive industry leader may, at first blush, seem unlikely partners – yet our shared values have given birth to tires that express a lifestyle, deliver performance and safety, and prove that sustainability can be so much more than a theory. It’s this kind of cross-industry collaboration that’s fueling real change and innovation in the marketplace.”

G.S. Sareen, president and CEO of Omni United said,  “Omni United and Timberland are taking an entirely different view of sustainability by designing Timberland Tires for a second life from the outset. That is one of the reasons why establishing a take-back and recycling program before the first tire is sold – and choosing an appropriate rubber formulation for recycling the tires into footwear – is so critical.  Our intent is to capture every worn Timberland Tire and recycle it for a second life, so none is used as fuel or ends up in a landfill.”

To bring the tire-to-shoe continuum to life, Timberland and Omni United have established an industry-first tire return/chain of custody process, to ensure the tires go directly to dedicated North American recycling facilities to begin their path toward a second life as part of a Timberland® product. Key steps include:

  • Tire retailers will set aside used Timberland Tires for recycling after consumers purchase new tires to replace their worn out tires.
  • Omni United is partnering with Liberty Tire Recycling and its network of tire collection and recycling firms to sort and segregate the Timberland Tires at the companies’ facilities.
  • The used tires will be shipped to a North American tire recycling facility where they will be recycled into crumb rubber.
  • The crumb rubber will be processed further into sheet rubber for shipment to Timberland outsole manufacturers.
  • The rubber will be mixed into a Timberland-approved compound for outsoles that will ultimately be incorporated into Timberland® boots and shoes. This blended compound will meet the company’s exacting standards for quality and performance, as well as its stringent compliance standards.

Timberland Tires will be sold initially in the United States at leading national and regional tire retailers, as well as online through a state-of-the-art e-commerce platform.

For more information about Timberland Tires, visit www.timberlandtires.com.





The North Face: This Land Is Your Land

27 10 2014

 

In a new campaign celebrating the benefits of the great outdoors, The North Face introduces a video today encouraging city dwellers to embrace nature and the environment.  Using Woody Guthrie’s venerable This Land Is Your Land reworked by My Morning Jacket, the campaign subtly demonstrates the uplifting benefits of outdoor activity.

The centerpiece of the campaign is the 90 second video.  The spot closes with the store’s long-running slogan, “Never stop exploring,” and urges consumers to download the new recording of the song from iTunes. The download will cost $1.29, with Apple pocketing its customary third and the rest going to the 21st Century Conservation Service Corps within the United States Interior Department, which hires veterans and at-risk young people to restore and preserve public land. Additionally, the retailer is contributing $250,000 to the corps.

 

Source:  The New York Times





Cause Driven Social Campaigns More Effective Than Brand Stories.

21 10 2014

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New research released in London this week points to the effectiveness of cause driven social campaigns activated by brands – showing superior business results than traditional brand communication stories, especially in social media.

In the report, Seriously Social by marketing consultant Peter Field, research indicates that not only were cause-driven campaigns better at delivering business effects — they also generated greater numbers of brand effects once the non-profits were removed from the equation.

Field analysed case studies from the Warc Prize for Social Strategy – a global competition for examples of social ideas that drive business results – defined social strategy as any activity designed to generate participation, conversation, sharing or advocacy.

“Cause-driven campaigns are more strongly associated with business effects,” Field stated, a finding that became even clearer when stripping non-profit campaigns out of the calculation.

Field was able to compare the impact of campaigns that associated a brand with a good cause, with the impact of those that built a story around a brand.
He found that media usage for cause-driven campaigns was more strongly focused on online, WOM/earned media and traditional advertising channels (excluding TV). Brand story campaigns, in contrast, made wider use of media channels and, as they were more likely to be short-term campaigns, included much more activation.

These patterns had an impact on subsequent effectiveness.  The business effectiveness of cause driven-campaigns was found to increase markedly over time, whereas that of brand story campaigns did not.

“Again, this is a reflection of the short-term outlook of the latter group,” Field said, who suggested that conclusions about effectiveness drawn over a period of less than six months would underplay the true strength of cause-driven campaigns.

Source:  WARC





Conservation International: Nature Is Speaking. And She’s Not Happy.

8 10 2014

“Nature doesn’t need people, people need nature.” 

In a series of short films debuting this week for Conservation International, Hollywood celebrities and advertising legend Lee Clow of TWBA Media Arts Lab lend a hand to raise awareness of the importance of protecting, preserving and nurturing the environment – for the good of mankind.

Narrated by various leading actors including Julia Roberts, Harrison Ford, Robert Redford, Ed Norton, Robert Redford, Penelope Cruz, Kevin Spacey, and Ian Somerhalder, each film highlights some aspect of the natural world and represents its point of view about the relationship with humanity.

Ford serves on the Conservation International Board of Directors and has been involved with the non-profit for twenty years.  He called on his celebrity friends to lend their voices to this important campaign.

In commenting on the campaign, Clow told Fast Company’s Co-Create:  “Like so many things right now in our culture and politics, everything seems so polarized that the two extreme ends are the loudest and everyone else in the middle is getting tired and sick of nobody being able to solve anything. That was the hope for this is to be a balanced message that everyone could get on board with.”

The films include the #NatureIsSpeaking hashtag the CI team is encouraging social media discussion with Twitter handles for each of the films’ subjects (@MotherNature_CI, @Ocean_CI, @Rainforest_CI, @Soil_CI, @Water_CI, @Redwood_CI, @CoralReef_CI).

HP, sponsor of the #NatureIsSpeaking hashtag will donate $1 to Conservation International, for every social media mention, up to $1 million.

 





CDP: Companies Managing Climate Change Enjoy 18% Higher Return On Equity

4 10 2014

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In a significant new report, CDP has demonstrated that among S&P 500 Industry Leaders, those corporations who have made significant efforts to reduce their impact on climate change have much improved financial performance and return on equity (ROE) than those companies who are not taking such steps and do not disclose their carbon impact. CDP’s analysis shows that, on climate change management, S&P 500 industry leaders:

  • Generate superior profitability: ROE 18% higher than low scoring peers and 67% higher than non-responders.
  • Have more stability with 50% lower volatility of earnings over the past decade than low scoring peers.
  • Grow dividends to shareholders: 21% stronger than low scoring peers.
  • Exhibit value attributes attractive to equity investors.
The report presents the progress achieved by 70% of S&P 500 companies in integrating climate change risk management into strategic planning, taking action towards emissions reductions and demonstrating a long-term view of how to best manage the assets of shareholders. In the report, Paul Simpson, CEO of CDP says, “There is a palpable sea change in approach by companies driven by a growing recognition that there is a cost associated with the carbon they emit. Measurement, transparency and accountability drives positive change in the world of business and investment.” Here are the CDP leading companies and their corresponding three year return on equity. Screen Shot 2014-10-04 at 1.04.55 PM   In commenting on the report, HP Chairman Meg Whitman said, “By integrating sustainability across the entire value chain, companies can capture return on capital today and build leadership and business value for their future. These investments help companies create a competitive advantage, build stability, and provide assurances to stakeholders that they are well positioned for the challenges of the 21st century.” Read the CDP Climate Action and Profitability Report here




Nielsen: Doing Well By Doing Good

3 07 2014

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55% of global respondents in Nielsen’s corporate social responsibility survey were willing to pay extra for products and services from companies committed to positive social and environmental impact—an increase from 45% in 2011.  However, people living in North America lag the global average, with only 42% saying they would be willing to pay extra – a 7% increase from three years ago.

As continued impactful climate change events and social consciousness raises people’s concern about companies’ impact on society, the importance of brand’s corporate responsibility reputations will continue to rise.  Brands which act responsibly and communicate those actions effectively will increasingly be the ones rewarded by consumers.

 

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Images:  Future Leaders in Philanthropy, Nielsen





Ceres: Sustainability Leadership and Responsibility Starts at the Top

7 05 2014

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“In some cases, companies have substantially accelerated and broadened their sustainability efforts. These companies are providing real leadership and demonstrating that sustainability isn’t a luxury, but rather an essential strategy for building long-term shareholder value.”  

 

In a new research tracking the progress of more than 600 corporations worldwide on broad ranging sustainability measures, Ceres and Sustainalytics are reporting that scientific and economic realities have shifted substantially from just a decade ago challenging companies to innovate and transform.

These are new leadership challenges that rise to the top at companies and demand the attention of top-level executives and Boards of Directors.  Among the findings of the report.

  • Boards of Directors are not taking enough responsibility for overseeing sustainability efforts. Thirty-two percent (198) of the 613 companies’ boards of directors formally oversee sustainability performance—up from 28 percent in 2012.
  • A growing number of companies are incorporating sustainability performance into executive compensation packages. Twenty-four percent of companies (146) link executive compensation to sustainability performance—up from 15 percent in 2012. Yet only 3 percent (19 companies) link executive compensation to voluntary sustainability performance targets, such as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reductions.
  • Companies are increasingly engaging investors on sustainability issues. Fifty-two percent (319 companies) are engaging investors on sustainability issues, up from 40 percent in 2012. The three percent (20 companies) in Tier 1 are using multiple tactics to engage investors including the integration of sustainability information into mainstream investor communications, highlighting sustainability performance and innovations at annual meetings, and directly engaging with shareholders on sustainability topics.

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  • Stakeholders are not consistently involved in the sustainability planning process. Only 36 percent of companies (219)—up from 29 percent in 2012—are disclosing information on how they formally engage stakeholders on sustainability issues. The seven percent (45 companies) in Tier 1 engage stakeholders in the materiality assessment process and disclose the insights gained from stakeholders.
  • More companies are actively engaging employees on sustainability issues. Forty percent (248 companies) have some programs in place to engage employees on sustainability issues—an increase from 30 percent in 2012. The six percent (37 companies) in Tier 1 go further by systematically embedding sustainability into company-wide employee engagement.
  • Companies are not doing enough to address water risks, especially in stressed regions.  Of the 103 water-intensive companies evaluated, 50 percent assess water-related business risks, a slight decline from the 55 percent in 2012. Only 26 percent (27 of 103 companies) are prioritizing efforts in water stressed regions.
  • Additional innovation is needed to drive sustainable products and services.  Of the 419 companies evaluated for this expectation, 14 percent (57 companies) have formal programs to invest in and promote sustainability products and services, compared to 10 percent in 2012.

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About the report partners:

Ceres is a non-profit organization advocating for sustainability leadership. We mobilize a powerful network of investors, companies and public interest groups to accelerate and expand the adoption of sustainable business practices and solutions to build a healthy global economy.

Sustainalytics is an award-winning provider of environmental, social, and governance research and analysis. We support investors around the world with the development and implementation of responsible investment strategies. Sustainalytics also partners with institutional investors that integrate ESG information and assessments into their investment decisions.





WHO: 1 in 8 Global Deaths Linked To Air Pollution

8 04 2014

The World Health Organization reports that in 2012 around 7 million people died – one in eight of total global deaths – as a result of air pollution exposure.  This finding more than doubles previous estimates and confirms that air pollution is now the world’s largest single environmental health risk.

CHINA SANDSTORM

Reducing air pollution could save millions of lives.

The new data reveal a strong link between air pollution exposure and cardiovascular diseases and cancer.  The new estimates are not only based on more knowledge about the diseases caused by air pollution, but also upon better assessment of human exposure to air pollutants through the use of improved measurements and technology. This has enabled scientists to make a more detailed analysis of health risks from a wider demographic spread that now includes rural as well as urban areas.

“Cleaning up the air we breathe prevents non-communicable diseases as well as reduces disease risks among women and vulnerable groups, including children and the elderly,” says Dr Flavia Bustreo, WHO Assistant Director-General Family, Women and Children’s Health. “Poor women and children pay a heavy price from indoor air pollution since they spend more time at home breathing in smoke and soot from leaky coal and wood cook stoves.”

“The risks from air pollution are now far greater than previously thought or understood, particularly for heart disease and strokes,” says Dr Maria Neira, Director of WHO’s Department for Public Health, Environmental and Social Determinants of Health. “Few risks have a greater impact on global health today than air pollution; the evidence signals the need for concerted action to clean up the air we all breathe.”

After analysing the risk factors and taking into account revisions in methodology, WHO estimates indoor air pollution was linked to 4.3 million deaths in 2012 in households cooking over coal, wood and biomass stoves. The new estimate is explained by better information about pollution exposures among the estimated 2.9 billion people living in homes using wood, coal or dung as their primary cooking fuel, as well as evidence about air pollution’s role in the development of cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, and cancers.

In the case of outdoor air pollution, WHO estimates there were 3.7 million deaths in 2012 from urban and rural sources worldwide.

Many people are exposed to both indoor and outdoor air pollution. Due to this overlap, mortality attributed to the two sources cannot simply be added together, hence the total estimate of around 7 million deaths in 2012.

“Excessive air pollution is often a by-product of unsustainable policies in sectors such as transport, energy, waste management and industry. In most cases, healthier strategies will also be more economical in the long term due to health-care cost savings as well as climate gains,” says Dr Carlos Dora, WHO Coordinator for Public Health, Environmental and Social Determinants of Health. “WHO and health sectors have a unique role in translating scientific evidence on air pollution into policies that can deliver impact and improvements that will save lives.”





Brandkarma: A new Global Reputation System for Brands

7 03 2014

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“Brands often fall short of their potential to do good – reputation without responsibility. Brandkarma will change that.”

Upendra Shardanand, founder Daylife

Welcome Brandkarma.com – the first social community that will rate and review brands ability to do good in the world.

Consumer research has repeatedly demonstrated that people expect businesses to operate responsibly and to contribute to positive change in the world.  Many people say that if brands fail to operate responsibly, they will stop purchasing the products that the brand provides.

Brandkarma.com was launched to empower consumers to better translate those beliefs into action.  Brandkarma.com allows consumers to see brands holistically – not only the quality of their products but the brand behaviors toward their employees, their community and the planet at large.

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visit brand karma.com here





Survey: Most Executives Believe In Sustainability, But Half Fail To Act.

28 01 2014

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In a new survey, nearly two-thirds of respondents rate social and environmental issues, such as pollution or employee health, as “significant” or “very significant” among their sustainability concerns. Yet only about 40% report that their organizations are largely addressing them. Even worse, only 10% say their companies fully tackle these issues.

Interestingly, the survey shows that while 67% of the business leaders surveyed strongly agree with the statement “climate change is real”, only 9% strongly agree that “my company is prepared for client change risk.”

In the 2013 report, new research by MIT Sloan Management Review and The Boston Consulting Group looks at companies that “walk the talk” in addressing significant sustainability concerns. So-called “Walkers” focus heavily on five fronts: sustainability strategy, business case, measurement, business model innovation and leadership commitment. For them, addressing significant sustainability issues has become a core strategic imperative and a way to mitigate threats and identify new opportunities.

Among the characteristics of “Walkers” in the survey,

  • More than 90% have developed a sustainability strategy, compared to 62% among all respondents.
  • 70% have placed sustainability permanently on their top management agenda, compared to an average of 39%.
  • 69% have developed a sustainability business case, compared to only 37% of all respondents.

Among the approximately 5000+ business leaders worldwide who participated in the research, the vast majority identify environmental and social issues as “very significant: or “significant.”

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Top management support is a very powerful catalyst of sustainability efforts — 68% of respondents say senior management has the greatest influence on sustainability endeavors. Employees are also part of the equation — 24% of respondents cite employees as the most influential. Employees place great value in working for companies with strong sustainability footprints. And they are often at the ready to accelerate progress.

According to the research report, “There is little disagreement that sustainability is necessary to be competitive — 86% of respondents say it is or will be. Sustainability’s next frontier is tackling the significant sustainability issues — or, in the parlance that is gaining currency, “material sustainability issues” — that lie at the heart of competitive advantage and long-term viability. Yet many companies struggle to match their strong level of sustainability concern with equally strong actions. They still wrestle with settling on which actions to pursue and aligning around them.”

Read the research report here.

About the Research

For the fifth consecutive year, MIT Sloan Management Review, in partnership with The Boston Consulting Group (BCG), conducted a global survey. The 2013 survey included more than 5,300 executive and manager respondents from 118 countries. This report is based on a smaller sub-sample of 1,847 respondents from commercial enterprises. Respondent organizations are located around the world and represent a wide variety of industries.





SOGB: Business Sustainability Progress Has Stalled

27 01 2014
According to the 2014 State of Green Business report published by GreenBiz Group in partnership with Trucost plc., companies around the world are struggling to make progress on climate change, resource efficiency and natural capital dependency.
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“While more and more companies are undertaking a growing number of initiatives to reduce their environmental impacts, there’s very little progress to show for it. Company initiatives are not having an impact at the scale needed to address such challenges as climate change and the availability of water and natural resources,” said Joel Makower, GreenBiz Group executive editor and the report’s principal author.
The seventh annual edition of the report, which measures the global progress of large, publicly traded companies in addressing a myriad of environmental challenges, reveals little meaningful progress across most metrics, including greenhouse gas emissions, water use, waste disposal and other pollutant impacts.
“The environmental impacts of business – air pollution, biodiversity loss, ecosystem degradation and water scarcity – are threatening the ability of our finite stock of natural capital to deliver sustainable growth,” said Richard Mattison, CEO of Trucost. “The challenge for business is to identify growth models that result in reduced environmental impact.
”The report also names the 10 sustainable business trends for 2014. Among them are the growth of collaboration among big corporations to solve mutual sustainability challenges, the growth of chemical transparency for consumer products, the emergence of “shadow pricing” as a means for companies to assess their environmental risks and net-positive buildings.
The 2014 report includes the launch of the Natural Capital Leaders Index, a new methodology for identifying companies that are growing their revenue while reducing their environmental impacts. The 2014 Index found 34 companies from 10 countries that met Trucost’s criteria, which include increasing revenue between 2008 and 2012, disclosure of greenhouse gas emissions and a decrease in environmental impacts during that same period.Among the 34 “decoupling leaders” are Carnival Corp., CSX, Intel, Kimberly-Clark, National Australia Bank, Pearson, Tata Power and Verizon.The Index further identifies US and Global “efficiency leaders” that use the least natural capital to generate revenue compared to sector peers – the more traditional sustainability leaders – which include Adobe Systems, AMEC, BMW, Ford, Manpower, McGraw Hill Financial, Pepco Holdings and Sprint Corp.The metrics from the report were drawn from Trucost’s assessment of 4,600 of the world’s largest companies representing 93% of global markets by market capitalization.The State of Green Business report will be the centrepiece of the upcoming GreenBiz Forum (Feb 18-20), taking place in Phoenix, AZ, where speakers will address many of these trends and metrics.The free report can be downloaded from GreenBiz.com.





CCC: Enhanced Reputation Key Goal of CSR Efforts.

17 01 2014

CSRNew reports cites increased funding, senior leadership appointments, management engagement and reputation enhancement goals for corporate citizenship.  The Center for Corporate Citizenship has released its The Profile of the Practice 2013.  The report explores how the environmental, social, and governance (ESG) dimensions of business—corporate citizenship—are managed in today’s business world, and how these practices have evolved since the last report in 2010.

“Corporate citizenship is managed at higher levels, corporate citizenship leaders are better compensated, and more companies establish both board committees and official budgeted departments to manage their programs,” said Katherine Smith, Executive Director, Boston College Center for Corporate Citizenship said in a statement. “These are all signs that CSR continues to be more deeply embedded in business as more executives realize that positive environmental, social and governance measures correlate to positive financial performance, improved reputation, and solid risk management.”

Among the key findings in the survey:

  • More than 70% of companies cited enhanced reputation among the top three business goals they are trying to achieve through their corporate citizenship efforts. The next most frequently cited goals are improving employee retention (45%), improving employee recruitment (41%), attracting new customers (33%), and improving risk management (22%).
  • The chief executive is more involved in developing strategy, setting goals, and communicating corporate citizenship than reported in both 2008 and 2010. More than 25% indicate that their chief executive is highly involved in corporate citizenship program evaluation.
  • Almost 100% of companies have a corporate citizenship budget today, while just 81% reported being budgeted in 2010.
  • Almost 60% of companies have an executive leading corporate citizenship. This is a 74% increase over what was reported in 2010. Close to one-third of corporate citizenship leaders are within one level of the chief executive.

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The survey was conducted in the Fall of 2013 of 231 companies  and their corporate citizenship strategies, operational structures, and business practices were analyzed. 

About the Center for Corporate Citizenship

The Carroll School of Management Center for Corporate Citizenship at Boston College is a membership-based knowledge center. Founded in 1985, the Center has a history of leadership in corporate citizenship research and education. The Center engages more than 400 member companies and more than 10,000 individuals annually to share knowledge and expertise about the practice of corporate citizenship through the Center’s professional development programs, online community, regional programs, and annual conference. The Center is a GRI-Certified Training Partner. For more information, visit the Center’s website at www.BCCorporateCitizenship.org.

 

 

 





National Research Council: Abrupt, near-term impacts to rival dinosaur extinction

10 12 2013

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With little fanfare and a noticeable lack of press coverage, the National Research Council released its report:  Abrupt Impacts of Climate Change: Anticipating Surprises last week.  The 200 page report suggests that a wave of species extinctions rivaling the dinosaurs’ demise might well be coming within the century — and that the time has come to set up early warning systems to detect this and other imminent climate catastrophes.

One of the authors, Anthony Barnosky, made this comment on the report:  “Our report focuses on abrupt change, that is, things that happen within a few years to decades: basically, over short enough time scales that young people living today would see the societal impacts brought on by faster-than-normal planetary changes.”

The study was sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Science Foundation, U.S. intelligence community and the National Academies, which is made up of The National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, Institute of Medicine and National Research Council.

Abrupt Changes Already Underway

Some of the abrupt changes are already taking place, according to the report.

  • The disappearance of late-summer sea ice in the Arctic, with predictions that it may be gone entirely within decades, which “would have potentially large and irreversible effects of various components of the Arctic East Coast system including disruptions in the marine food web, shifts and habitats of summary mammals, and erosion of vulnerable coastlines.”

Because the Arctic region interacts with a large-scale circulation systems of the ocean and atmosphere, changes in the extent of sea ice could cause shifts in climate and weather around the northern hemisphere. The Arctic is also region of increasing economic importance for diverse range of stakeholders, and reductions in Arctic sea ice will bring new legal and political challenges this navigation routes for commercial shipping open and marine access to the region increases for offshore oil and gas development, tourism, fishing and other activities.

  • Rapidly increasing extinction of plant and animal species at a rate already “probably as fast as any warming event in the past 65 million years, and it is projected that its pace over the next 30 to 80 years will continue to be faster and more intense.”   The report cites the following scenarios for species extinction.

If unchecked, habitat destruction, fragmentation, and over-exploitation, even without climate change, could result in a mass extinction within the next few centuries equivalent in magnitude to the one that wiped out the dinosaurs. With the ongoing pressures of climate change, comparable levels of extinction conceivably could occur before the year 2100; indeed, some models show a crash of coral reefs from climate change alone as early as 2060 under certain scenarios.

  • Destabilization of the west Antarctic ice sheet, an “abrupt change of unknown probability,” carries the threat of sea-level rise “at a rate several times faster than those observed today. “

Early Warning System 

In the face of these threats, the report urges development of an Abrupt Change Early Warning System (ACEWS) to closely monitor signals of tipping points drawing near, digest the data and feed it into the best predictive models that can be developed.   “We watch our streets, we watch our banks,” the report’s chief author, climatologist James White of the University of Colorado at Boulder, told the Los Angeles Times. “But we do not watch our environment with the same amount of care and zeal.”  In a press statement releasing the report, Mr. White said “The time has come for us to quit talking and take action.  Right now we don’t know what many of these thresholds are.  But with better information, we will be able to anticipate some major changes before they occur and help reduce the potential consequences.”

The executive summary of the report concludes with this rather dire warning:

“Although there is much to learn about climate change and abrupt impacts, to willingly ignore the threat of abrupt change could lead to more costs, loss of life, suffering and environmental degradation.  The time is here to be serious about the threat of the tipping points so as to better anticipate and prepare ourselves for the inevitable surprises.”





Project Sunlight: Unilever’s Call To Action For Sustainable Living

21 11 2013

Unilever has launched  a worldwide new initiative to motivate millions of people to adopt more sustainable lifestyles.  Launched yesterday on Universal Children’s Day in Brazil, India, Indonesia, the UK and the US, Project Sunlight aims to make sustainable living desirable and achievable by inspiring people, and in particular parents, to join what Unilever sees as a growing community of people who want to make the world a better place for children and future generations.

Project Sunlight was launched with the four-minute film embedded here and created by DAVID Latin America and Ogilvy & Mather London at dawn on November 20th in Indonesia and then follow the sun to India, the UK, Brazil and the US. Additional information can be found at an online hub – www.projectsunlight.com – which brings together the social mission stories of Unilever’s brands across the world, and invites consumers to get involved in doing small things that help their own families, others around the world and the planet.

To mark the launch of Project Sunlight on Universal Children’s Day, Unilever will be helping 2 million children through its ongoing partnerships, providing school meals through the World Food Programme; supporting Save the Children to provide clean, safe drinking water; and improved hygiene through UNICEF.

Ogilvy & Mather Chairman and CEO Miles Young, explains: “Unilever asked us to find a new way to talk about sustainability that would make the benefits real for ordinary people. Project Sunlight is founded on the principle that even small actions can make a big difference and that together, we can create a brighter future.  We are honored to be a part of such a positive and significant movement for the good of our client and our communities.”  Famed film director Erroll Morris directed “Why bring a child into this world?” including moving interviews with expectant parents from around the world.

The project draws on the legacy of Unilever’s founder Lord Leverhulme, who believed that he could change the world with a brand of soap he called Sunlight.

Kudos to Unilever, Ogilvy, DAVID and everyone involved in this important initiative that hits at the heart of the matter: if we can’t work to improve living conditions on our precious planet, how dare you bring a child into this world.





86% of Americans Expect Food and Beverage Brands To Actively Help Recycle Their Packaging.

12 11 2013

Recycling-binsAn overwhelming majority of Americans want brands to get engaged in creating and implementing recycling programs, according to a new survey of 1000 adults by the Carton Council of North America (CCNA).

In a statement, Jason Pelz, VP of environment at Tetra Pak North America, and VP of recycling projects for the CCNA  said, “First and foremost, this survey reiterates the importance of including a recycling message on product packaging.  In an increasingly competitive and green‑minded climate, consumers are revealing they expect food and beverage brands to actively help increase the recycling of their packages.”

U.S. consumers also indicated that they look first to the products they purchase for environmental information, ahead of other resources, with the vast majority (76 percent) consulting a product’s packaging to learn if a package is recyclable, followed by the product’s company website (33 percent) and the consumer’s city website (26 percent).

Importantly, 45% say their loyalty to food and beverage brands would be impacted by that brand’s engagement with environmental causes.

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The Carton Council is leading a national effort to increase access to carton recycling in the U.S. In 2009, 21 million U.S. households had access to carton recycling in 26 states. Now, 52.5 million households in 45 states can recycle cartons, a 150 percent increase that includes 64 of the nation’s top 100 cities. Food and beverage brands that use cartons for their products are encouraged to join this effort, especially in helping promote carton recycling to their customers. CCNA can provide companies with tools to inform their customers — from the first step, which is adding the recycling logo to packages and recycling information on their websites, to an extensive list of possibilities beyond that.





Survey Shows Weak Collaboration Around Sustainability In Companies

11 11 2013

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BSR/GlobeScan of 700+ corporate sustainability executives in companies worldwide shows decreasing levels of collaboration between sustainability functions and other core corporate functions.

Survey respondents note a lower level, and decreasing, engagement between sustainability functions and corporate functions, such as investor relations (with 37 percent of those surveyed saying they engage with investor relations, down 1 point from 2011), human resources (34 percent, down 3 points), R&D (32 percent, down 9 points), marketing (28 percent, down 14 points).  The weakest area of engagement is between corporate sustainability and finance at 16 percent, down 2 points from 2011.  Unless greater collaboration is made in this area, the business case for sustainability and its potential positive impact on financial performance will be very difficult to make.

“The trend toward weaker engagement between sustainability functions and core functions such as finance, marketing, HR, investor relations, and R&D, is concerning.” Chris Coulter, CEO at GlobeScan, noted, “Not only is engagement limited with these strategic areas, but collaboration between them and sustainability teams has declined—in some cases by a significant margin. While there is a clear need for external collaboration, there is an equally important case to be made for greater internal collaboration.”

Additional topline findings from this survey include:

  • When asked to choose which sustainability issues need collaboration the most, climate change and public policy frameworks promoting sustainability are ranked highest.
  • Only one in five companies has fully integrated sustainability into business.
  • Engagement between sustainability functions and corporate functions such as marketing, R&D, and finance remains very low.
  • Collaboration by BSR member companies focuses more often on engagement with NGOs and other businesses than it does on engagement with government.

Fewer companies collaborate often with governments (46 percent) or media (27 percent), both of which are rated as the most difficult partners for collaboration.

21 percent report that their company is close to full integration. A majority say that their company is either about halfway to integration (51 percent), or is just getting started (22 percent).

“The survey reveals both the sense of urgency to address climate change, and the sense that meaningful progress goes well beyond the steps a single company can take,” observed Aron Cramer, President and CEO of BSR.  “No one sector—not business, government, civil society, or consumers—can ‘save us’ from climate change.

 

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One Year After Sandy: Companies Push White House On Climate Action Plan

29 10 2013

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20 leading corporations – including Starbucks, Levis, Unilever and Mars -call on President Obama to follow through on climate change preparedness efforts outlined in the Climate Action Plan announced by the President on June 25th.

The corporate signatories of the letter, which rely on the stability of global supply chains for growth and profitability, cited the economic impacts of severe weather events on company operations and called for ongoing and significant investments to be made in strengthening climate change resiliency both in the United States and the world’s most vulnerable countries. Many of the signatories are members of Business for Innovative Climate & Energy Policy – a group of businesses advocating for meaningful energy and climate legislation.

Critical components of President Obama’s Climate Action Plan included federal investments in climate science, and support for disaster planning and risk management in multiple sectors. On the anniversary of one of the most catastrophic weather events in history, the companies reiterated the need for federal funding of programs and projects that benefit the most vulnerable communities and the businesses they rely on for employment, products and services.

“Our businesses depend upon a resilient infrastructure, resilient communities, and resilient value chains,” the companies wrote in a letter to President Obama today. “In recent years, severe weather events, combined with rising temperatures, have devastated critical infrastructure, decreased crop yields, and threatened water supplies. These trends are being felt globally… We call upon your administration to follow through on commitments for robust support of climate change resilience efforts.”

“Public investment in climate resilience is critical to the economic viability of companies we invest in that rely on consumers, labor, raw materials, and operations located in regions susceptible to extreme weather,” said Bennett Freeman, SVP for Sustainability Research and Policy at Calvert Investments. “We applaud the U.S. government for making investments in resilience and hope to see this strengthened in future years.”

“Extreme weather trends pose challenges to managing reliable supply chains and business planning,” said Anna Walker, Senior Director, Government Affairs and Public Policy at Levi Strauss & Co. “While Levi Strauss & Co. is committed to addressing its climate impact, we believe U.S. government leadership is essential for widespread action on climate resilience to strengthen communities and minimize economic disruption.”

The signatories recognized the Obama Administration’s efforts thus far to address climate change, and expressed support for public and private sector collaboration to continue advancing the implementation of the Climate Action Plan.

“The human and economic costs of severe weather are escalating and it is increasingly important that business and communities integrate climate risk into their operational and decision-making processes,” said Mark Way, Head of Sustainability Americas at Swiss Re America. “As experts on risk, everything we see points to the fact that climate change is something we simply cannot ignore.”





The Aspirational Consumer: 2.5 Billion People Redefining Responsible Consumption

8 10 2013

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A new global consumer study confirms the rise of nearly 2.5 billion consumers globally who are uniting style, social status and sustainability values to redefine consumption.

According to the report by BBMG, GlobeScan and SustainAbility : The 2013 Aspirational Consumer Index – more than one-third of consumers globally (36.4%) identify as Aspirationals, defined by their love of shopping (78%), desire for responsible consumption (92%) and their trust in brands to act in the best interest of society (58%). The study draws from a telephone and in-person survey of more than 21,000 consumers across 21 international markets conducted in April 2013.

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According to Eric Whan, Sustainability Director at GlobeScan, “Aspirationals are materialists who define themselves in part through brands and yet they believe they have a responsibility to purchase products that are good for the environment and society.  By engaging Aspirational consumers, brands can further the shift toward more sustainable consumption and influence behavior change at scale.”

Key characteristics of Aspirational consumers include:

  • Trust in Brands: Nearly six in ten Aspirational consumers globally say they “trust global companies to act in the best interest of society” (58%), compared with 52% of all consumers;
  • Seek Style and Status: Three-fourths of Aspirational consumers say “I want to stand out by the way I look, my style” (73%), compared to 53% of all consumers;
  • Positive Influencers: Nearly nine in ten Aspirational consumers say “I encourage others to buy from socially and environmentally responsible companies” (88%), compared to 63% of all consumers;
  • Empowered Shoppers: Nearly eight in ten Aspirational consumers say “shopping for new things excites me” (78%), compared to 48% of all consumers, and believe they “can change how a company behaves based on my purchase decisions” (78%), compared with 66% of all consumers;
  • Responsible Consumers: Nine in ten Aspirational consumers say “I believe we need to consume less to preserve the environment for future generations” (92%), compared to 75% of all consumers, and that they are “willing to pay more for products produced in a socially and environmentally responsible way” (91%) compared to 64% of all consumers;
  • Young and Urban: Demographically, Aspirational consumers make up the largest percentage of Millennial (40%) and GenX (37%) generations, compared to 32% and 33% in the general population, respectively, and nearly six and ten (59%) live in cities; and
  • Strength in Emerging Markets: Countries with the largest populations of Aspirational consumers include China (46%), Nigeria (45%), Pakistan (44%), India (42%), Australia (41%), Canada (40%), Indonesia (38%), Greece (37%), France (36%), USA (36%), Turkey (35%) and the UK (34%).

“Driven by young, optimistic consumers in emerging markets and amplified by technology and social media’s influence, Aspirationals represent a powerful shift in sustainable consumption from obligation to desire,” said Raphael Bemporad, co-founder and chief strategy officer at brand innovation consultancy BBMG. “With Aspirationals, the sustainability proposition has changed from being the ‘right thing to do’ to being the ‘cool thing to do,’ and brands have a profound opportunity to harness sustainable design and societal values to inspire the next generation of commerce and create positive impact in the world.”

“For decades, green marketers have been speaking to the wrong consumers, assuming that by engaging the most committed ‘advocates’ we would create significant business growth, cultural relevance and change at scale,” Bemporad added. “What makes Aspirationals so compelling is that they combine an authentic commitment to sustainability with a love of shopping, design and social status, aligning economic, cultural and social forces to shift the way we shop.”

“With 2.5 billion consumers worldwide, Aspirationals offer an important opportunity to redefine sustainable consumption,” said Mark Lee, Executive Director at SustainAbility. “Like never before, brands can engage Aspirationals to pioneer new models and practices that can deliver economic growth while reducing negative impacts on the environment.”

 

Read the original press release on CSR Wire.





Stay or Stall? Great Lakes Oil Shipping On Hold….For Now.

24 09 2013

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This week it was announced that a proposed crude oil shipping terminal on Lake Superior has been put on hold.   The proposed terminal would have shipped crude oil from the Bakken fields in North Dakota to be loaded onto oil tankers to be shipped to the East Coast.  As preposterous as this idea was in the first place, public pressure needs to be raised and continued to ensure that this proposal never comes up again.  Be it feasible or not.

Adolph Ojard, executive director of the Duluth Seaway Port Authority, was quoted in an article in the Minneapolis Star Tribune:   “It was one of those things that was a trial balloon being floated out there.  Economically, I don’t know if it really makes sense to move crude oil on the Great Lakes given the current conditions. It’s more efficient to move it by rail and pipeline.”

Thank god.  But economic conditions change and this idea needs to be permanently put to bed through public pressure and legislation.  There is much more at stake than economics.

Consider the Facts:

The Great Lakes make up the largest body of fresh water on Earth.

The Great Lakes contain one fifth of the freshwater surface on the planet, some 6 quadrillion gallons and 5,500 cubic miles of water.

The United States draws more than 40 billion gallons of water from the Great Lakes every day.

More than 35 million people rely on the Great Lakes for drinking water.

The Great Lakes support a $7 billion fishery industry and $16 billion tourism industry.

More than 800 toxic contaminants have already been identified in the Great Lakes water and sediment.

Even with these facts in hand, oil thirsty prospectors would consider shipping oil across this precious freshwater resource.   Many, many people would be thirsty if this plan goes ahead and inevitably awry.

Dangerous Waters

The combination of severe storms and unpredictable underwater topography make the Great Lakes on of the most dangerous bodies of water for navigation in the world.  The Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum approximates 6,000 ships have been lost – while historian and mariner Mark Thompson has estimated that the total number of wrecks is likely more than 25,000. In the modern period between 1816, when the Invincible was lost, to the sinking of the Fitzgerald in 1975, the Whitefish Point area alone has claimed at least 240 ships.  Proposed oil tankers necessarily would sail past Whitefish Point on Lake Superior from the terminal in Superior, Wisconsin to the Soo Locks.

What We Learned In Alaska

Wildlife, economies and people are still recovering from the devastating natural and economic disaster from a single wreck of the oil tanker Exxon Valdez in Prince William Sound in Alaska.  It is considered to be one of the most devastating human-caused environmental disasters. The Valdez spill was the largest ever in US waters until the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in terms of volume.  Prince William Sound’s remote location, accessible only by helicopter, plane, or boat, made government and industry response efforts difficult and severely taxed existing plans for response.   Many parts of the Great Lakes are equally inaccessible.

In 1991, following the collapse of the local marine population (particularly clams, herring, and seals) the Chugach Alaska Corporation, filed for bankruptcy protection. It has since recovered. According to several studies funded by the state of Alaska, the spill had both short-term and long-term economic effects. These included the loss of sports fisheries, reduced tourism, and an estimate of what economists call “existence value“, which is the value to the public of a pristine Prince William Sound.  The economy of the city of Cordova, Alaska was adversely affected after the spill damaged stocks of fish in the area. Several residents, including one former mayor, committed suicide after the spill.

But the disaster that was the Exxon Valdez happened in salt water.  People don’t drink salt water.

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 Share this article with any Great Lakes residents and lovers that you know.  Write your Congressman.  Start your own campaign.  If you are concerned about your future and the future of your family, please get engaged to prevent crude oil shipping on the Great Lakes.





United Nations: CEOs say sustainability less important.

24 09 2013

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In a massive new study which interviewed 1,000 CEOs around the world, The United Nations and Accenture report that only 32% of CEOs believe the global economy is on track to meet the demands of a growing population within global environmental and resource constraints.  Alarmingly, the number of CEOs of saying that sustainability is “very important” to their business success dropped to 45%, a decline from 54% just three years ago.

The third United Nations Global Compact – Accenture CEO Study On Sustainability 2013 points to CEOs concern about an uncertain global economic climate as directly impacting the urgency of addressing sustainable business operations.  Despite the report that 63% of CEOs expect sustainability to transform their business within five years – and 76% believe that embedding sustainability into core business will drive revenue growth and new opportunities – many struggle with market expectations, investor pressure and the difficulty of measuring the business value of sustainability.

The report demonstrates how the world’s CEOs are conflicted on the extent to which they believe that business is making sufficient efforts to address sustainability. with 33% agreeing business is making the acceptable effort, while 38% disagree.  See the report chart below:

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In an executive summary of the CEO survey, the authors conclude:

“CEOs clearly recognize the scale of the global challenge—but may not yet see the urgency or the incentive for their own businesses to do more and to have a greater impact. This disconnect suggests that a gap persists between the approach to sustainability of the majority of companies globally—an approach centered on philanthropy, compliance, mitigation and the license to operate—and the approach being adopted by leading companies, focused on innovation, growth and new sources of value.”

Other key findings in the report include:

  • 83% of CEOs see an increase in efforts by governments and policy makers to provide an enabling environment for the private sector as integral to advancing sustainability.
  • 85% of CEOs demand clearer policy and market signals to support green growth.
  • Only 29% of CEOs regard climate change as one of the most important sustainability challenges for the future of their business
  • And just 14% regard water sanitation as an important issue for their business to address.

Clearly the lack of progress on the global economy and the failure of governments and regulators to provide consistent sustainability frameworks are holding back CEOs from focusing their full attention on the long-term issues of sustainability and threatened natural resources.  As the report highlights, more urgency is needed:

“As business leaders across the world come together this year to set out an architecture to align business action with global priorities, there is a clear and unequivocal call for greater ambition, greater speed and greater impact.”

– United Nations Global Compact

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Carbon Trust: 2/3 of public unable to name businesses that take sustainability seriously.

23 09 2013

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In a recent survey of more than 1,800 adults in the United Kingdom, The Carbon Trust Fund found that 68% of people were unable to name a company that is taking sustainability seriously.

In addition, just 5% of respondents see businesses as being most effective in helping the environment.  Despite the significant efforts many companies across the world are making to turn their business operations to more responsible and sustainable entities, the UK study underscores how poorly those companies are communicating their actions.

According to Tom Delay, the chief executive of Carbon Trust:

“While it’s clear that consumers still care about the environmental future, their perspective on where the responsibility falls is skewed. It cannot be solely down to environmental groups to shoulder the weight of protecting our planet’s natural resources. Businesses have an enormous role to play here and need to be seen to be doing their part.  As businesses look for more ways to grow, sustainability should become a golden opportunity for investment, allowing them to become more resilient to future environmental resource shocks and to cut their costs and grow their revenues. The smart companies will invest now and put sustainability inside their businesses.”

The same survey of UK adults did have some encouraging signs regarding concern for the environment.   The demand for green products appears to be increasing with only 6% saying they are less likely to buy a sustainable product and/or service than five years ago while almost three in ten (27%) said they are more likely.   Increased concern about the personal impact of what they buy on the environment was the most important reason for this (45%) and 43% of the public surveyed said they lead a more sustainable life than five years ago.